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I want to insert a newline character into an array of characters which initially is a string. Let's say I have a variable myvar = "Blizzard". A string is formed from an array of characters. How can I insert a newline character inside it? In hope of making an output like this:

"B
 lizzard"

I tried this:

myvar[1] = "\n"

but it's not working, and the output is like this:

"B\nlizzard"

My goal is to make the output like this:

B
l
i
z
z
a
r
d

without using puts. I have to do it by inserting newline characters into the array. Can someone point out where my mistake is, and if possible help me with this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To add \n you can use this:

myvar = "Blizzard"
myvar.chars.map { |c| c + "\n" }.join.strip

Or better @Uri solution:

myvar.chars.join "\n"

But you can puts letters one on the line with next code:

myvar.chars.each { |c| puts c }

or:

myvar.each_char { |c| puts c } # for ruby >= 2.0

by Darek Nędza

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Well, starting from Ruby ~2.0 You may use each_char instead of chars.each. I think it may be faster. –  Darek Nędza Jun 15 at 12:56
    
Thanks for suggestion, yes it's a bit faster. –  zishe Jun 15 at 13:01
    
Well thanks Nedza for that works with output, uh but err.. Actually that's not my goal, I mean not the output like that, I mean the string must be added newline character for every one character, and my friend told me about using for 1 in 0..(text.length -1 ) and if statement, but I really don't know what he means. But thanks anyway this is a new info for me too :) –  LuminaChen Jun 15 at 16:54
    
Well, this 'Blizzard'.chars.join("\n") did exactly what you want. –  zishe Jun 15 at 22:19
1  
Thanks everyone exactly great. –  LuminaChen Jun 16 at 2:44
'Blizzard'.chars.join("\n")
# => "B\nl\ni\nz\nz\na\nr\nd" 

If all you want is to print the characters each in a new row you can do the following:

puts 'Blizzard'.chars

Output:

B
l
i
z
z
a
r
d
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Thank you Agassi, this is good. –  LuminaChen Jun 16 at 2:46

You have done myvar[1] = "\n" correctly. Your problem is not how you did it, but what you are expecting.

You seem to be confusing the inspection of a string and the puts output of the string. Inspection is what is displayed as the return value as in irb, and it is a meta-representation of what you have. And as long as it is a string, it will be delimited by double quotes, and all the special characters will be escaped with a backslash \. If you have a new line character, that would be represented as "\n". On the other hand, when you pass the string to puts, you will get the output according to what the special characters represent.

What you displayed as what you want (the one in multiple lines) should be the result of puts. You will never get such thing as inspection of the string.

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1  
Thanks sawa for pointing out that to me, it gives me more clarity abuot this issue :) –  LuminaChen Jun 16 at 2:42

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