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I have a JSON feed that looks like this (I removed some fields that aren't necessary for this example):

{
  "total_count": 2,
  "num_pages": 1,
  "current_page": 1,
  "balance": {
    "amount": "0.00001199",
    "currency": "BTC"
  },
  "transactions": [
    {
      "transaction": {
        "id": "5018f833f8182b129c00002f",
        "created_at": "2012-08-01T02:34:43-07:00",
        "sender": {
          "id": "5011f33df8182b142400000e",
          "name": "User Two",
          "email": "user2@example.com"
        },
        "recipient": {
          "id": "5011f33df8182b142400000a",
          "name": "User One",
          "email": "user1@example.com"
        }
      }
    },
    {
      "transaction": {
        "id": "5018f833f8182b129c00002e",
        "created_at": "2012-08-01T02:36:43-07:00",
        "hsh": "9d6a7d1112c3db9de5315b421a5153d71413f5f752aff75bf504b77df4e646a3",
        "sender": {
          "id": "5011f33df8182b142400000e",
          "name": "User Two",
          "email": "user2@example.com"
        },
        "recipient_address": "37muSN5ZrukVTvyVh3mT5Zc5ew9L9CBare"
      }
    }
 ]
}

There are two types of transactions in this feed: internal transactions that have a recipient, and external transactions that have a hsh and recipient_address.

I created the following classes to accomodate this structure:

UML

So we have a base class for all paged results (PagedResult) with a specific implementation for transactions (TransactionPagedResult). This result has a collection containing 0..* transactions (abstract class Transaction). They're not of the type Transaction though, but of type InternalTransaction or ExternalTransaction which are implementations of Transaction.

My question is how I can let JSON.NET handle this. I want JSON.NET to see whether the current transaction it's parsing is an InternalTransaction or an ExternalTransaction, and add the according type to the IEnumerable<Transaction> collection in TransactionPagedResult.

I created my own JsonConverter that I added as a property to the IEnumerable<Transaction> with the [JsonConverter(typeof(TransactionCreationConverter))] attribute, but this didn't work, I get the following error:

Additional information: Error reading JObject from JsonReader. Current JsonReader item is not an object: StartArray. Path 'transactions', line 1, position 218.

I understand this is because JSON.NET tries to deserialize the whole collection, but I want it to deserialize each object inside the collection one by one.

Anyone?

share|improve this question
    
good post so far, but could you please add the information of what exactly you mean by ... "but this didn't work" at the very end of your post? –  isi Jun 15 at 12:51
    
Yes, I didn't add that because I didn't want the post to become too long. I get an error that the JsonReader item is not an object but an array (which is correct, since I placed the attribute on the IEnumerable collection). I want the JsonConverter to look at every single item in IEnumerable though, which are all objects. –  Leon Cullens Jun 15 at 13:00
    
@Jack I think you linked to the wrong thread? –  Leon Cullens Jun 15 at 13:02
    
Does this help? stackoverflow.com/questions/7699972/… edit: fixed link –  Jack Jun 15 at 13:08
1  

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your question is essentially a duplicate of this one, and the solution is the same. You need a JsonConverter to instantiate the correct object. However, there are a couple of differences that I see.

If you look at the converter implementation from the other answer, you can see that it looks for a boolean flag in the JSON to determine the type to instantiate. In your case, there is not such a flag, so you'd need to use the existence or absence of a field to make this determination. Also, your list of transactions in the JSON is actually a list of objects that contain transactions, so the converter needs to account for that as well.

With these changes, your converter should look something like this:

public class TransactionConverter : JsonConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return typeof(Transaction).IsAssignableFrom(objectType);
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, 
        Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        JToken transaction = JToken.Load(reader)["transaction"];
        if (transaction["recipient"] != null)
        {
            return transaction.ToObject<InternalTransaction>();
        }
        else
        {
            return transaction.ToObject<ExternalTransaction>();
        }
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, 
        object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

assuming that your classes are defined like this:

class TransactionPagedResult
{
    [JsonProperty(ItemConverterType=typeof(TransactionConverter))]
    public IEnumerable<Transaction> Transactions { get; set; }
}

class Transaction
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("created_at")]
    public DateTime CreatedAt { get; set; }
}

class InternalTransaction : Transaction
{
    public User Recipient { get; set; }
}

class ExternalTransaction : Transaction
{
    public string Hsh { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("recipient_address")]
    public string RecipientAddress { get; set; }
}

class User
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
}

Also, to answer the last part of your question, if you decorate your list with a [JsonConverter] attribute, the converter is expected to handle the entire list. To handle the individual items, you need to use [JsonProperty(ItemConverterType=typeof(TransactionConverter))] on the list instead. I've edited the class definitions above to make this clear.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! This does the trick :) Thanks a lot for the example and explanation! :) –  Leon Cullens Jun 15 at 20:46
    
No problem; glad I could help. –  Brian Rogers Jun 16 at 2:26

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