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class FakeBase(object):
    def __init__(self, *args):
        pass

class Parent(FakeBase):
    def __init__(self, x=1, *args):
        super().__init__(x, *args)
        self.var1 = x

class Parent2(FakeBase):
    def __init__(self, x=3, y=4, *args):
        super().__init__(x, y, *args)
        self.var2 = x
        self.var3 = y

class Child(Parent, Parent2):
    def __init__(self, z, *args):
        super().__init__(*args)
        self.var4 = z

childObject = Child("var4", "var3", "var1", "var2")
print(childObject.var1)
print(childObject.var2)
print(childObject.var3)
print(childObject.var4)

The result is:

var3
var3
var1
var4

I just started dealing with Python multiple inheritance.

Here, I am only able to call the super().__init__(x) with one parameter. And it will only call the parent's __init__(). I want to initial var2 and var3 also. How to do that?

Getting hits from your answers, I tried to modified my code.

But, still not getting the way to initial all four parameters. And none of your answers did neither.

Thanks and still waiting for the answer.

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2  
Make everything handle *args and **kwargs or have the same signature. Also, why is everything a class attribute? –  jonrsharpe Jun 15 at 21:34
    
    
@jonrsharpe, yes that is not my intent. fixed. –  user1947415 Jun 16 at 13:06

1 Answer 1

Here's a solution building on @jonrsharpe's suggestion. Method uses *args signature for generic variables, which are passed to parent(s). The specific variable z is captured separately and used by the class.

source

class parent(object):
    var1=1
    def __init__(self,x=1):
        self.var1=x

class parent2(object):
    var2=11
    var3=12
    def __init__(self,x=3,y=4):
        self.var2=x
        self.var3=y

    def parprint(self):
        print(self.var2)
        print(self.var3)

class child(parent, parent2):
    var4=5
    def __init__(self, z, *args):
        super(child,self).__init__(*args)
        self.var4 = z

childobject = child(9,"var3")
print(childobject.var1)
print(childobject.var2)
print(childobject.var3)
print(childobject.var4)
childobject.parprint()

output

var3
11
12
9
11
12
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