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I implemented withFile in Haskell:

withFile' :: FilePath -> IOMode -> (Handle -> IO a) -> IO a  
withFile' path iomode f = do
  handle <- openFile path iomode
  result <- f handle
  hClose handle
  return result

When I ran the main provided by Learn You a Haskell, it printed out the content of "girlfriend.txt," as expected:

import System.IO

main = do
    withFile' "girlfriend.txt" ReadMode (\handle -> do 
        contents <- hGetContents handle
        putStr contents)

I wasn't sure if my withFile' would've worked with the last 2 lines: (1) close the handle and (2) returning the result as anIO a.

Why didn't the following happen?

  1. result gets lazily bound to f handle
  2. hClose handle closes the file handle
  3. result gets return'd, which results in the actual evaluate of f handle. Since handle was closed, an error gets thrown.
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@ThreeFx I'm sorry, but that's not true. – Ørjan Johansen Jun 15 '14 at 23:58

Lazy IO is popularly known as confusing.

It depends on whether putStr executes before hClose or not.

Notice the difference between the first and second uses (the brackets are unnecessary but clarifying in the second example).

ghci> withFile' "temp.hs" ReadMode (hGetContents >=> putStr) -- putStr 
    import System.IO
    import Control.Monad
    withFile' :: FilePath -> IOMode -> (Handle -> IO a) -> IO a  
    withFile' path iomode f = do
        handle <- openFile path iomode
        result <- f handle
        hClose handle
        return result
ghci> (withFile' "temp.hs" ReadMode hGetContents) >>= putStr
ghci>

In both cases, the f passed in gets a chance to run before the handle is closed. Because of lazy evaluation, hGetContents only reads the file if it needs to, i.e. is forced to in order to produce output for some other function.

In the first example, since f is (hGetContents >=> putStr), the full contents of the file must be read in order to execute putStr.

In the second example, nothing needs to be evaluated after hGetContents in order to return result, which is a lazy list. (I can quite happily return (show [1..]) which will only fail to terminate if I choose to use the entire output.) This is seen as a problem for lazy IO, which is fixed by alternatives such as strict IO, pipes or conduit.

Maybe returning the empty string for a file when the handle was closed prematurely is a bug, but certainly running the entirety of f before closing it is not.

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1  
It might be worth pointing him to the strict versions from text or bytestring or the strict-io package. – Gabriel Gonzalez Jun 16 '14 at 0:01
    
Returning the empty string for a file when the handle was closed seems nuts—the only sensible value is an error: "abc"++error "Can't get blood from a stone.". – dfeuer Jun 16 '14 at 1:06
    
@GabrielGonzalez I look up to you as a Haskell great. You are always welcome to edit my posts as much as you like with whatever content you feel it would benefit from! – AndrewC Jun 16 '14 at 2:32
    
@dfeuer Indeed, I agree, but Ben's answer correctly points out that "Once a semi-closed handle becomes closed, the contents of the associated list becomes fixed. The contents of this final list is only partially specified: it will contain at least all the items of the stream that were evaluated prior to the handle becoming closed.". Welcome to lazy IO! Hmm. I feel I'm attacking lazy IO a lot. Lazy IO is handy, easy and efficient for some applications. It is counterintuitive sometimes though. – AndrewC Jun 16 '14 at 2:35
1  
@AndrewC Alright, I will try my hand at this, then :) – Gabriel Gonzalez Jun 16 '14 at 3:07

Equational reasoning means that you can reason about Haskell code by just inlining and substituting things (with certain caveats, but they don't apply here).

This means that all I need to do to understand your code is to take the withFile' here:

import System.IO

main = do
    withFile' "girlfriend.txt" ReadMode (\handle -> do 
        contents <- hGetContents handle
        putStr contents)

... and inline its definition:

main = do
    handle   <- openFile "girlfriend.txt" ReadMode
    contents <- hGetContents handle
    result   <- putStr contents
    hClose handle
    return result

Once you inline its definition, it's easier to see what is going on. putStr evaluates the entire contents of the file before you close the handle, so there is no error. Also, result is not what you think it is: it's the return value of putStr, which is just (), not the contents of the file.

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Most IO actions are not lazily executed.

IO action execution is different from normal Haskell evaluation of values. IO execution is only ever carried out by the outer driver that is trying to execute all the effects of main; it does so in the correct order implied by the monadic sequencing of IO actions.

The driver's need to know what the next IO action is ultimately triggers all evaluation of lazy values in Haskell; if it were happy with an unevaluated lazy value and moved on to the next thing without fully evaluating and executing it, then it would just leave main unevaluated and no Haskell program could ever do anything.

The Haskell value resulting from executing an IO action may of course be an unevaluated lazy value, but each IO action itself is evaluated and executed by the driver (including all sub-actions sequenced with do blocks or binds).

So result doesn't get lazily bound to f handle completely unevaluated; f handle is evaluated to come up with the sub actions hGetContents handle and putStr contents. These are both fully executed before the outer driver moves on to hClose handle, so everything's okay.


Note however that hGetContents is special. Quoting from the documentation:

Computation hGetContents hdl returns the list of characters corresponding to the unread portion of the channel or file managed by hdl, which is put into an intermediate state, semi-closed. In this state, hdl is effectively closed, but items are read from hdl on demand and accumulated in a special list returned by hGetContents hdl.

Any operation that fails because a handle is closed, also fails if a handle is semi-closed. The only exception is hClose. A semi-closed handle becomes closed:

  • if hClose is applied to it;
  • if an I/O error occurs when reading an item from the handle;
  • or once the entire contents of the handle has been read.

Once a semi-closed handle becomes closed, the contents of the associated list becomes fixed. The contents of this final list is only partially specified: it will contain at least all the items of the stream that were evaluated prior to the handle becoming closed.

So executing hGetContents handle actually results in a partially evaluated list, whose lazy evaluation is tied to further IO operations under the hood. This is impossible to do yourself without using the Unsafe family of operations, since it is essentially bypassing the type system and can result in exactly the sort of problem you were concerned about; if you had attempted the following code:

main = do
    text <- withFile' "girlfriend.txt" ReadMode (\handle -> do 
        contents <- hGetContents handle
        return contents)
    putStr text

(where the function passed to withFile' tries to return the file contents, and they are passed to putStr after the withFile' call), then the putStr would be executed after hClose, and the file may well not have been fully read before it was closed.

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