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Is there a valid way to do the following in Haskell:

case n of
    0     -> doThis
    1     -> doThat
    2     -> doAnother
    3..99 -> doDefault

other than to have 97 lines of "doDefault" ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted
case n of
    0     -> doThis
    1     -> doThat
    2     -> doAnother
    _     -> doDefault

If you really need a range,

case n of
    0     -> doThis
    1     -> doThat
    2     -> doAnother
    x | 3 <= x && x < 100 -> doDefault
    _     -> reallyDoDefault
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That's it. The second one. Thanks. –  me2 Mar 11 '10 at 9:29
    
Makes me wish the Prelude defined "inRange lo hi v = lo <= v && v < hi"… –  MtnViewMark Mar 11 '10 at 14:42
4  
A generalized form of that is in Data.Ix: case n of _ | inRange (3,100) n -> ... –  Edward KMETT Mar 11 '10 at 14:57

I think you can have the default case be the _ pattern, which matches on anything.

case n of
  0 -> doThis
  1 -> doThat
  2 -> doAnother
  _ -> doDefault

I'm not sure if that's quite what you're looking for, since it doesn't check the upper bound on the range there... you might want to use guards instead.

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Using guards! ;)

Foo n 
  | n == 0 = doThis
  | n == 1 = doThat
  | n == 2 = doAnother
  | (n >= 3 ) && (n <= 99) = doDefault 


OR

  | n `elem` [3..99] =  doDefault
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It should be n == 0, etc. –  Alexey Romanov Mar 11 '10 at 10:13
    
Thanks! Alexey Romanov –  Pratik Deoghare Mar 11 '10 at 10:27
    
I personally like the n `elem` [3..99] version more than the one using inequalities. –  Tikhon Jelvis Dec 5 '11 at 23:31
    
Isn't the elem-based version significantly slower ? or is this optimized away ? –  b0fh Sep 12 '12 at 12:06
    
@b0fh : yep, elem is just any (==) which is O(n), afaik it is impossible to check membership with lower than O(n) complexity unless the collection you are checking is sorted somehow. –  user1131180 Nov 28 '14 at 20:17

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