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I was just experimenting to see what happens when a cold task (i.e. a Task which hasn't been started) is awaited. To my surprise the code just hung forever and "Finsihed" is never printed. I would expect that an exception is thrown.

public async Task Test1()
{
    var task = new Task(() => Thread.Sleep(1000));
    //task.Start();
    await task;
}

void Main()
{
    Test1().Wait();
    Console.WriteLine("Finished");
}

Then I though perhaps the task can be started from another thread, so I changed the code to:

public async Task Test1()
{
    var task = new Task(() => Thread.Sleep(1000));
    //task.Start();
    await task;

    Console.WriteLine("Test1 Finished");
}

void Main()
{
    var task1 = Test1();

    Task.Run(() => 
    {
        Task.Delay(5000);   
        task1.Start();
    });

    task1.Wait();
    Console.WriteLine("Finished");
}

But it is still blocked at task1.Wait(). Does anyone know if there is way to start a cold task after it has being awaited?

Otherwise it seems there is no point in being able to await a cold task, so perhaps the task should either be started when awaited or an exception should be thrown.

Update

I was awaiting the wrong task, i.e. the outer task returned by Test1 rather than the one newed inside it. The InvalidOperationException mentioned by @Jon Skeet was being thrown inside Task.Run however because the resulting task was not observed, the exception was not thrown on the main thread. Putting a try/catch inside Task.Run or calling Wait() or Result on the task returned by Task.Run threw the exception on the main console thread.

share|improve this question
up vote 13 down vote accepted

You're trying to start the task returned by the async method - that isn't the cold task that you started out with. Indeed, if you add some diagnostics to your Task.Run call, you'll see that an exception is thrown:

System.InvalidOperationException: Start may not be called on a promise-style task.

Here's an example showing what I think you were really trying to do:

using System;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

public class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Not using Task.Delay! That would be pointless
        Task t1 = new Task(() => Thread.Sleep(1000));
        Task t2 = Await(t1);
        Console.WriteLine(t2.Status);
        Console.WriteLine("Starting original task");
        t1.Start(); 
        Console.WriteLine(t2.Status);
        t2.Wait();
        Console.WriteLine(t2.Status);        
    }

    static async Task Await(Task task)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Beginning awaiting");
        await task;
        Console.WriteLine("Finished awaiting");        
    }
}

Note the use of Thread.Sleep instead of Task.Delay; unless you're using the result of Task.Delay, it basically does nothing. Using Thread.Sleep is emulating real work to be done in the other task.

As for why awaiting an unstarted task doesn't throw an exception - I think that's reasonable, to be honest. It allows for situations like the above to be valid, which may in some cases make life easier. (You may create a lot of tasks before starting them, for example - and you may want to start waiting for them to finish before you start them.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon, I think I tangled myself up a little – Ned Stoyanov Jun 16 '14 at 6:41

Does anyone know if there is way to start a cold task after it has being awaited?

You still can create a cold task from an async method and start it later, if that's what you want:

class Program
{
    public static async Task Test1()
    {
        await Task.Delay(1000);
        Console.WriteLine("Test1 is about to finish");
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var taskOuter = new Task<Task>(Test1);
        var taskInner = taskOuter.Unwrap();

        Task.Run(() =>
        {
            Thread.Sleep(2000);

            // run synchronously
            taskOuter.RunSynchronously();

            // or schedule
            // taskOuter.Start(TaskScheduler.Defaut);
        });

        taskInner.Wait();
        Console.WriteLine("Enter to exit");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, that clears it up – Ned Stoyanov Jun 16 '14 at 6:39

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