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We are using a fulltext search to search for the name of a company and all is going well until we have a company with an ampersand in its name, e.g. 'M&S'.

SELECT name FROM company WHERE MATCH (name) against ('M&S' IN BOOLEAN MODE);

This fails to return any results as MySQL is treating the ampersand as a boolean operator. The boolean mode is desired so it can't simply be turned off.

What I'm looking for is a way to escape the ampersand so that MySQL treats it correctly and finds the record.

Ditching fulltext search in favour of LIKEs isn't exactly an option either

Thanks for your help

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2  
I don't see & listed as a special character in the documentation: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/fulltext-boolean.html. Are you sure it's not because M&S is too short to be indexed? See the ft_min_word_len option, it defaults to 4. –  Barmar Jun 16 '14 at 7:39
    
@Barmar ft_min_word_len is set to 2 as we have quite a few very short company names. –  Rob Forrest Jun 16 '14 at 7:40
1  
Another possibility is that & is treated as a word delimiter. So that's actually two words: M and S with punctuation between them. –  Barmar Jun 16 '14 at 7:42
1  
See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/fulltext-fine-tuning.html for how to change the characters that are considered part of a word rather than delimiters. –  Barmar Jun 16 '14 at 7:45
    
@Barmar I tried set global ft_boolean_syntax = '+ -><()~*:""_|'; to remove the & from the syntax but that appears to have made no difference. Perhaps Positions 10, 13, and 14 (which by default are set to “:”, “&”, and “|”) are reserved for future extensions prevents that. –  Rob Forrest Jun 16 '14 at 7:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

Seems like & isn't considered a word character in the collation you use for your fulltext search.

so you have to recompile your MySQL server or create your own collation where you add & to the list of word characters like i found out in the MySQL docs ( http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/fulltext-fine-tuning.html) :

If you want to change the set of characters that are considered word characters, you can do so in several ways, as described in the following list. After making the modification, you must rebuild the indexes for each table that contains any FULLTEXT indexes. Suppose that you want to treat the hyphen character ('-') as a word character. Use one of these methods:

Modify the MySQL source: In myisam/ftdefs.h, see the true_word_char() and misc_word_char() macros. Add '-' to one of those macros and recompile MySQL.

Modify a character set file: This requires no recompilation. The true_word_char() macro uses a “character type” table to distinguish letters and numbers from other characters. . You can edit the contents of the array in one of the character set XML files to specify that '-' is a “letter.” Then use the given character set for your FULLTEXT indexes. For information about the array format, see Section 10.3.1, “Character Definition Arrays”.

Add a new collation for the character set used by the indexed columns, and alter the columns to use that collation. For general information about adding collations, see Section 10.4, “Adding a Collation to a Character Set”. For an example specific to full-text indexing, see Section 12.9.7, “Adding a Collation for Full-Text Indexing”.

UPDATE: in case you are using latin1 collation, open your XML file which is at mysql/share/charsets/latin1.xml. and find the corresponding character code in a map - in this case you can take the map for lower case or upper case because this doesn't matter for the ampersand symbol:

<lower>
<map>
 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F
 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 1A 1B 1C 1D 1E 1F
 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F
 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 3F
 40 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 6A 6B 6C 6D 6E 6F
 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 7A 5B 5C 5D 5E 5F
 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 6A 6B 6C 6D 6E 6F
 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 7A 7B 7C 7D 7E 7F
 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 8A 8B 8C 8D 8E 8F
 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 9A 9B 9C 9D 9E 9F
 A0 A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7 A8 A9 AA AB AC AD AE AF
 B0 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 B9 BA BB BC BD BE BF
 E0 E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6 E7 E8 E9 EA EB EC ED EE EF
 F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 D7 F8 F9 FA FB FC FD FE DF
 E0 E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6 E7 E8 E9 EA EB EC ED EE EF
 F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8 F9 FA FB FC FD FE FF
</map>
</lower>

the ampersand's unicode is U+0026 and in utf-8 encoding it's 0x26, so search for 26 in the map - which is in the 3rd row, 7th column.

then in the ctype-map change the type of the character from 10 which means punctuation to 01 which means small letter:

<ctype>
<map>
 00
 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 28 28 28 28 28 20 20
 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20
 48 10 10 10 10 10 01 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10
 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 10 10 10 10 10 10
 10 81 81 81 81 81 81 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 10 10 10 10 10
 10 82 82 82 82 82 82 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 10 10 10 10 20
 10 00 10 02 10 10 10 10 10 10 01 10 01 00 01 00
 00 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 02 10 02 00 02 01
 48 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10
 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10
 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 10 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 02
 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 10 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
</map>
</ctype>

restart your MySQL server and the corresponding collation is handling & like it was a small letter.

of course it's better to first copy and rename your new collation XML-file and to also copy and paste the corresponding lines in the Index.xml (don't forget to use a new unused id in the XML tags there) and link them to your new collation XML-file so you don't lose your original collation.

you can find the full documentation where i got most of the information from here: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/full-text-adding-collation.html

share|improve this answer
    
Wow! This might actually be a solution. Sadly I'm not really in a position to recompile MySQL to test this out, I hear its an absolute nightmare. –  Rob Forrest Jun 25 '14 at 14:59
    
@RobForrest you don't have to recompile it, that's just one of the 3 available methods described here. look at the 3rd paragraph i quoted: This requires no recompilation ... You can edit the contents of the array in one of the character set XML files to specify that '-' is a “letter.” –  northkildonan Jun 25 '14 at 15:02
    
My bad, I read recompile and pretty much zoned out. –  Rob Forrest Jun 25 '14 at 15:15
    
I'd like to look more into modifying a character set but I have literally no idea where to start. All the documentation I can find is really wooly, do you have any examples? –  Rob Forrest Jun 26 '14 at 8:16
    
see my updated answer. –  northkildonan Jun 26 '14 at 9:34

& is not a special character in mysql therefore you are able to store and search for the expression & you can test that as followed

    SELECT name FROM  `testing` WHERE name LIKE  '%&%'

also please try somthing like the following to replace the &.

    SET @searchstring = 'M&S';
    SET @searchstring = REPLACE(@searchstring,'&','&amp;');
    SELECT name FROM company WHERE MATCH (name) against (@searchstring IN BOOLEAN MODE);


You may also take a look at regexp. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/regexp.html
Here the & is used as followed.

    mysql> SELECT '&' REGEXP '[[.ampersand.]]';


The following query is also getting you the result

    SELECT * 
    FROM  `testing` 
    WHERE  `name` REGEXP CONVERT( _utf8 'M&S'
    USING latin1 ) COLLATE latin1_german2_ci 
    LIMIT 0 , 30

please also read this thread, maybe you can understand it better then me. This is SQL but they seem to have solved the problem http://forums.asp.net/t/1073707.aspx?Full+text+search+and+sepcial+characters+like+ampersand+

sorry I couldn´t help more

share|improve this answer
    
This question is very specifically about fulltext searching, i.e. Match (x) Against (y) not like so your 1st and 3rd suggestions aren't really solutions. As for your second suggestion, that doesn't return the expected results as MySQL treats the & as a special character. –  Rob Forrest Jun 25 '14 at 13:35
    
the OP specifically said that you can't use LIKE ... it does pull it out when using like which is a good example.. but the I think the IN BOOLEAN MODE makes the & a non escapable special character –  John Ruddell Jun 25 '14 at 13:37
    
regexp is a complex search tool and it was a suggestion. Normaly & is no special char, but what john said makes sense –  veritaS Jun 25 '14 at 13:39
    
yea its not a special character that mysql recognizes to escape... but it seems like the boolean mode does that. it seems like the OP is stuck using the MATCH ... AGAINST.. method, do you know of a way to work with that parameter? –  John Ruddell Jun 25 '14 at 13:52
1  
Have you tried this?? "A phrase that is enclosed within double quote (“"”) characters matches only rows that contain the phrase literally, as it was typed." dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/fulltext-boolean.html –  veritaS Jun 25 '14 at 13:52

EDIT: so the & is splitting it into two separate words... since they are 1 letter it is not returning anything. I tested with "Ma&Sa".. my ft_min_word_len = 4... and it didn't return anything so since the length of that string > 4 but its not returning it has to be splitting it into two words... it looks like the suggestion northkildonan made is what you have to do.

So this may or may not be an answer.. but I hope it is helpful for figuring this out.. try this.

first: run this statement -- SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'ft_min_word_len'; and affirm that the length is actually = 2 if it is i'm not sure how it is any different than a word that is longer than a length of 4

Second: I did this and got results.

SET UP:

I set up a sample table on my localhost database...

create table company(
`id` int,
`name` varchar(55)
);

insert into company
(`id`, `name`)
values
(1, 'oracle'),
(2, 'microsoft'),
(3, 'M&S'),
(4, 'dell');

TESTS: tested when ft_min_word_len = 4 and obviously it didn't return anything.

SELECT `name` FROM company WHERE MATCH (`name`) against ("M&S" IN BOOLEAN MODE);

I didn't want to try restarting my localhost database to reset the length to 2 (incase I accidentally mess something up because I use it a lot)..

but I got the idea of trying to look for the name of a company that was longer than a length of 4 with the & in it.

MORE SETUP:

insert into company
(`id`, `name`)
values
(5, 'Mary&Sasha');

ANOTHER TEST:

SELECT `name` FROM company WHERE MATCH (`name`) against ("Mary&Sasha" IN BOOLEAN MODE); 

this returned http://screencast.com/t/Rx8mh98OUp

I also did this just incase the collation was messing it up but I doubt that was the problem..

COLLATION STUFF:

ALTER TABLE company MODIFY
    `name` VARCHAR(55)
      CHARACTER SET latin1
      COLLATE latin1_german2_ci;

you can also check your tables collation with:

SHOW TABLE STATUS;

hope this is at least some help :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks John but the company names are what they are. –  Rob Forrest Jun 25 '14 at 14:52
    
I've now tried changing the character set too and that doesn't seem to make any difference. –  Rob Forrest Jun 25 '14 at 14:54
    
@RobForrest I know the company names are what they are.. what I was trying to show is that the & does not seem to be a problem as that exact query works with 'Mary&Sasha' ... did you try running SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'ft_min_word_len';? because you have to restart the database to change the length –  John Ruddell Jun 25 '14 at 15:08
    
John, my minimum word length is 2. Setting it to 1 to fall in line with your example is not a sensible option. –  Rob Forrest Jun 25 '14 at 15:14
    
@RobForrest I wasn't saying set it to 1.. that statement just shows what its set at.. 1 would not be sensible at all... i wonder why I don't have an issue with using it on Mary&Sasha –  John Ruddell Jun 25 '14 at 15:24

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