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Currently I'm using this:

f = open(filename, 'r+')
text = f.read()
text = re.sub('foobar', 'bar', text)
f.seek(0)
f.write(text)
f.close()

But the problem is that the old file is larger than the new file. So I end up with a new file that has a part of the old file on the end of it.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 58 down vote accepted

If you don't want to close and reopen the file, to avoid race conditions, you could truncate it:

f = open(filename, 'r+')
text = f.read()
text = re.sub('foobar', 'bar', text)
f.seek(0)
f.write(text)
f.truncate()
f.close()
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Probably it would be easier and neater to close the file after text = re.sub('foobar', 'bar', text), re-open it for writing (thus clearing old contents), and write your updated text to it.

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import fileinput
for line in fileinput.FileInput("file",inplace=1):
    if "foobar" in line:
         line=line.replace("foobar","bar")
    print line
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