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I've a performance related question regarding use of StringBuilder. In a very long loop I'm manipulating a StringBuilder and passing it to another method like this:

for (loop condition) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.append("some string");
    . . .
    sb.append(anotherString);
    . . .
    passToMethod(sb.toString());
}

Is instantiating StringBuilder at every loop cycle is a good solution? And is calling a delete instead better, like the following?

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for (loop condition) {
    sb.delete(0, sb.length);
    sb.append("some string");
    . . .
    sb.append(anotherString);
    . . .
    passToMethod(sb.toString());
}
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14 Answers 14

The second one is about 25% faster in my mini-benchmark.

public class ScratchPad {

    static String a;

    public static void main( String[] args ) throws Exception {
        long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for( int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++ ) {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            sb.append( "someString" );
            sb.append( "someString2"+i );
            sb.append( "someStrin4g"+i );
            sb.append( "someStr5ing"+i );
            sb.append( "someSt7ring"+i );
            a = sb.toString();
        }
        System.out.println( System.currentTimeMillis()-time );
        time = System.currentTimeMillis();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for( int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++ ) {
            sb.delete( 0, sb.length() );
            sb.append( "someString" );
            sb.append( "someString2"+i );
            sb.append( "someStrin4g"+i );
            sb.append( "someStr5ing"+i );
            sb.append( "someSt7ring"+i );
            a = sb.toString();
        }
        System.out.println( System.currentTimeMillis()-time );
    }
}

Results:

25265
17969

Note that this is with JRE 1.6.0_07.


Based on Jon Skeet's ideas in the edit, here's version 2. Same results though. So stop upvoting the people saying #1 is faster. :)

public class ScratchPad {

    static String a;

    public static void main( String[] args ) throws Exception {
        long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for( int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++ ) {
            sb.delete( 0, sb.length() );
            sb.append( "someString" );
            sb.append( "someString2" );
            sb.append( "someStrin4g" );
            sb.append( "someStr5ing" );
            sb.append( "someSt7ring" );
            a = sb.toString();
        }
        System.out.println( System.currentTimeMillis()-time );
        time = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for( int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++ ) {
            StringBuilder sb2 = new StringBuilder();
            sb2.append( "someString" );
            sb2.append( "someString2" );
            sb2.append( "someStrin4g" );
            sb2.append( "someStr5ing" );
            sb2.append( "someSt7ring" );
            a = sb2.toString();
        }
        System.out.println( System.currentTimeMillis()-time );
    }
}

Results:

5016
7516
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2  
I've added an edit in my answer to explain why this might be happening. I'll look more carefully in a while (45 mins). Note that doing concatenation in the append calls reduces the point of using StringBuilder in the first place somewhat :) –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '08 at 7:26
1  
Also it would be interesting to see what happens if you reverse the two blocks - the JIT is still "warming up" StringBuilder during the first test. It may well be irrelevant, but interesting to try. –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '08 at 7:27
    
Tried both. It's still a lot faster. –  Epaga Oct 28 '08 at 7:33
    
I'd still go with the first version because it's cleaner. But it's good that you've actually done the benchmark :) Next suggested change: try #1 with an appropriate capacity passed into the constructor. –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '08 at 7:35
16  
Use sb.setLength(0); instead, it's the fastest way to empty the contents of StringBuilder against recreating object or using .delete(). Note that this doesn't apply to StringBuffer, its concurrency checks nullify the speed advantage. –  P Arrayah Nov 11 '08 at 21:00
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In the philosophy of writing solid code its always better to put your StringBuilder inside your loop. This way it doesnt go outside the code its intended for.

Secondly the biggest improvment in StringBuilder comes from giving it an initial size to avoid it growing bigger while the loop runs

for (loop condition) {
  StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(4096);
}
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You could always scope the whole thing with curly brackets, that way you don't have the Stringbuilder outside. –  Epaga Oct 28 '08 at 7:37
    
@Epaga: It's still outside the loop itself. Yes, it doesn't pollute the outer scope, but it's an unnatural way to write the code for a performance improvement which hasn't been verified in context. –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '08 at 7:42
    
Or even better, put the whole thing in its own method. ;-) But I hear ya re: context. –  Epaga Oct 28 '08 at 7:46
    
Better yet initialize with the expected size instead of sum arbitrary number (4096) Your code may return a String that references a char[] of size 4096 (depends on the JDK; as far as I remember that was the case for 1.4 ) –  kohlerm Oct 28 '08 at 7:53
    
Yes indeed i should have mentioned that. –  Peter Oct 28 '08 at 9:21
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Faster still:

public class ScratchPad {

    private static String a;

    public static void main( String[] args ) throws Exception {
        long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder( 128 );

        for( int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++ ) {
            // Resetting the string is faster than creating a new object.
            // Since this is a critical loop, every instruction counts.
            //
            sb.setLength( 0 );
            sb.append( "someString" );
            sb.append( "someString2" );
            sb.append( "someStrin4g" );
            sb.append( "someStr5ing" );
            sb.append( "someSt7ring" );
            setA( sb.toString() );
        }

        System.out.println( System.currentTimeMillis()-time );
    }

    private static void setA( String aString ) {
        a = aString;
    }
}

In the philosophy of writing solid code, the inner workings of the method should be hidden from the objects that use the method. Thus it makes no difference from the system's perspective whether you redeclare the StringBuilder within the loop or outside of the loop. Since declaring it outside of the loop is faster, and it does not make the code more complicated to read, then reuse the object rather than reinstantiate it.

Even if the code was more complicated, and you knew for certain that object instantiation was the bottleneck, comment it.

Note that "someString"+i is the true bottleneck as the + operator is expensive; use append(...) instead.

Three runs with this answer:

$ java ScratchPad
1567
$ java ScratchPad
1569
$ java ScratchPad
1570

Three runs with the other answer:

$ java ScratchPad2
1663
2231
$ java ScratchPad2
1656
2233
$ java ScratchPad2
1658
2242

Although not significant, setting the StringBuilder's initial buffer size will give a small gain.

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Okay, I now understand what's going on, and it does make sense.

I was under the impression that toString just passed the underlying char[] into a String constructor which didn't take a copy. A copy would then be made on the next "write" operation (e.g. delete). I believe this was the case with StringBuffer in some previous version. (It isn't now.) But no - toString just passes the array (and index and length) to the public String constructor which takes a copy.

So in the "reuse the StringBuilder" case we genuinely create one copy of the data per string, using the same char array in the buffer the whole time. Obviously creating a new StringBuilder each time creates a new underlying buffer - and then that buffer is copied (somewhat pointlessly, in our particular case, but done for safety reasons) when creating a new string.

All this leads to the second version definitely being more efficient - but at the same time I'd still say it's uglier code.

(EDIT: I've now deleted my other answer as irrelevant and unhelpful.)

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Just some funny info about the .NET, there situation is different. The .NET StringBuilder internally modifies regular "string" object and toString method simply returns it (marking it as non-modifiable, so consequent StringBuilder manipulations will re-create it). So, typical "new StringBuilder->modify it->to String" sequence will not make any extra copy (only for expanding the storage or shrinking it, if resulting string length is much shorter than its capacity). In Java this cycle always makes at least one copy (in StringBuilder.toString()). –  Ivan Dubrov Jul 16 '09 at 1:54
    
The Sun JDK pre-1.5 had the optimization you were assuming: bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6219959 –  Dan Berindei May 1 '11 at 12:42
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Since I don't think it's been pointed out yet, because of optimizations built into the Sun Java compiler, which automatically creates StringBuilders (StringBuffers pre-J2SE 5.0) when it sees String concatenations, the first example in the question is equivalent to:

for (loop condition) {
  String s = "some string";
  . . .
  s += anotherString;
  . . .
  passToMethod(s);
}

Which is more readable, IMO, the better approach. Your attempts to optimize may result in gains in some platform, but potentially losses others.

But if you really are running into issues with performance, then sure, optimize away. I'd start with explicitly specifying the buffer size of the StringBuilder though, per Jon Skeet.

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The modern JVM is really smart about stuff like this. I would not second guess it and do something hacky that is less maintainable/readable...unless you do proper bench marks with production data that validate a non-trivial performance improvement (and document it ;)

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Where "non-trivial" is key - benchmarks can show one form being proportionally faster, but with no hint about how much time that's taking in the real app :) –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '08 at 7:28
    
See the benchmark in my answer below. The second way is faster. –  Epaga Oct 28 '08 at 7:34
    
@Epaga: Your benchmark says little about the performance improvement in the real app, where the time taken to do the StringBuilder allocation may be trivial compared with the rest of the loop. That's why context is important in benchmarking. –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '08 at 7:40
    
@Jon I understand, but I*m assuming that if his whole question is geared towards which one has a higher performance, that a 25-50% difference IS important and that that part of his code will be called many times. –  Epaga Oct 28 '08 at 7:43
    
@Epaga: Until he's measured it with his real code, we'll have no clue how significant it really is. If there's a lot of code for each iteration of the loop, I strongly suspect it'll still be irrelevant. We don't know what's in the "..." –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '08 at 7:52
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Based on my experience with developing software on Windows I would say clearing the StringBuilder out during your loop has better performance than instantiating a StringBuilder with each iteration. Clearing it frees that memory to be overwritten immediately with no additional allocation required. I'm not familiar enough with the Java garbage collector, but I would think that freeing and no reallocation (unless your next string grows the StringBuilder) is more beneficial than instantiation.

(My opinion is contrary to what everyone else is suggesting. Hmm. Time to benchmark it.)

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The thing is that more memory has to be reallocated anyway, as the existing data is being used by the newly created String at the end of the previous loop iteration. –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '08 at 7:19
    
Oh that makes sense, I had though that toString was allocating and returning a new string instance and the byte buffer for the builder was clearing instead of re-allocating. –  cfeduke Oct 28 '08 at 7:27
    
Epaga's benchmark shows that clearing and re-using is a gain over instantiation at every pass. –  cfeduke Oct 28 '08 at 7:43
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LOL, first time i ever seen people compared the performance by combining string in StringBuilder. For that purpose, if you use "+", it could be even faster ;D. The purpose of using StringBuilder to speed up for retrieval of the whole string as the concept of "locality".

In the scenario that you retrieve a String value frequently that does not need frequent change, Stringbuilder allows higher performance of string retrieval. And that is the purpose of using Stringbuilder.. please do not MIS-Test the core purpose of that..

Some people said, Plane flies faster. Therefore, i test it with my bike, and found that the plane move slower. Do you know how i set the experiment settings ;D

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Alas I'm on C# normally, I think that clearing a StringBuilder weights more than instanciating a new one.

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The first is better for humans. If the second is a bit faster on some versions of some JVMs, so what?

If performance is that critical, bypass StringBuilder and write your own. If you're a good programmer, and take into account how your app is using this function, you should be able to make it even faster. Worthwhile? Probably not.

Why is this question stared as "favorite question"? Because performance optimization is so much fun, no matter whether it is practical or not.

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It isn't an academic question only. While most of the times (read 95%) I prefer readability and maintainability, there are really cases that little improvements makes big differences... –  Pier Luigi Oct 30 '08 at 13:08
    
OK, I'll change my answer. If an object provides a method that allows it to be cleared and reused, then do so. Examine the code first if you want to make sure the clear is efficient; maybe it releases a private array! If efficient, then allocate the object outside the loop and reuse it inside. –  dongilmore Nov 2 '08 at 17:23
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The reason why doing a 'setLength' or 'delete' improves the performance is mostly the code 'learning' the right size of the buffer, and less to do the memory allocation. Generally, I recommend letting the compiler do the string optimizations. However, if the performance is critical, I'll often pre-calculate the expected size of the buffer. The default StringBuilder size is 16 characters. If you grow beyond that, then it has to resize. Resizing is where the performance is getting lost. Here's another mini-benchmark which illustrates this:

private void clear() throws Exception {
    long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
    int maxLength = 0;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    for( int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++ ) {
        // Resetting the string is faster than creating a new object.
        // Since this is a critical loop, every instruction counts.
        //
        sb.setLength( 0 );
        sb.append( "someString" );
        sb.append( "someString2" ).append( i );
        sb.append( "someStrin4g" ).append( i );
        sb.append( "someStr5ing" ).append( i );
        sb.append( "someSt7ring" ).append( i );
        maxLength = Math.max(maxLength, sb.toString().length());
    }

    System.out.println(maxLength);
    System.out.println("Clear buffer: " + (System.currentTimeMillis()-time) );
}

private void preAllocate() throws Exception {
    long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
    int maxLength = 0;

    for( int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++ ) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(82);
        sb.append( "someString" );
        sb.append( "someString2" ).append( i );
        sb.append( "someStrin4g" ).append( i );
        sb.append( "someStr5ing" ).append( i );
        sb.append( "someSt7ring" ).append( i );
        maxLength = Math.max(maxLength, sb.toString().length());
    }

    System.out.println(maxLength);
    System.out.println("Pre allocate: " + (System.currentTimeMillis()-time) );
}

public void testBoth() throws Exception {
    for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    	clear();
    	preAllocate();
    }
}

The results show reusing the object is about 10% faster than creating a buffer of the expected size.

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Not significantly faster, but from my tests it shows on average to be a couple millis faster using 1.6.0_45 64 bits: use StringBuilder.setLength(0) instead of StringBuilder.delete():

time = System.currentTimeMillis();
StringBuilder sb2 = new StringBuilder();
for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
    sb2.append( "someString" );
    sb2.append( "someString2"+i );
    sb2.append( "someStrin4g"+i );
    sb2.append( "someStr5ing"+i );
    sb2.append( "someSt7ring"+i );
    a = sb2.toString();
    sb2.setLength(0);
}
System.out.println( System.currentTimeMillis()-time );
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The fastest way is to use "setLength". It won't involve the copying operation. The way to create a new StringBuilder should be completely out. The slow for the StringBuilder.delete(int start, int end) is because it will copy the array again for the resizing part.

 System.arraycopy(value, start+len, value, start, count-end);

After that, the StringBuilder.delete() will update the StringBuilder.count to the new size. While the StringBuilder.setLength() just simplify update the StringBuilder.count to the new size.

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Declare once, and assign each time. It is a more pragmatic and reusable concept than an optimization.

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