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Using the INSERT statement in MySQL, it is easy to input an AUTO_INCREMENT value for a primary key. Is there such a feature for the UPDATE statement?

What I imagine is a table something like this:

users
userid  username    password    email   ... unique_updated_id

Each time a user updates something in the users table, the unique_updated_id will contain MAX(unique_updated_id)+1. This will be used in a system that synchronizes with the database. It remembers the last unique_updated_id it received and sends this back when fetching for an update from the server.

So, when users change their information in the database, their unique_updated_id will be updated to SELECT MAX(unique_updated_id)+1 FROM users. This will tell the synchronization process that only information updated after the unique_updated_id specified will be sent.

However, I'm concerned that due to a possible race condition, I might not be able to achieve the desired behavior with

UPDATE users SET email='something@something.net',unique_updated_id=(SELECT MAX(unique_updated_id)+1 FROM users) WHERE userid=1;

How do I ensure that the unique_updated_id will always be unique and will have a continuous numbering for all UPDATE and INSERT queries?

I'm trying to implement this in PHP so executing queries separated by a semi-colon does not seem to be a solution in ensuring that two queries can be executed consecutively without other queries being executed in between.

share|improve this question
    
Well tables can have more than one primary key. Why cant you attack auto_increment to unique_updated_id –  Useless Intern Jun 16 at 13:35
    
Wouldn't that just return errors in case of conflicts? Say 3 queries running simultaneously: QUERY1 sets UUI=10, QUERY2 sets UUI=10, QUERY3 sets UUI=10. Wouldn't that just return errors when QUERY2 and QUERY3 are executed? –  Greenback Boogie Jun 16 at 13:39
    
Nah, requests on the server are queued so it would process them in the order received and update them accordingly. That's why it's more reliable that doing it yourself. Though someone more experienced in SQL can provide better insight. –  Useless Intern Jun 16 at 13:41

2 Answers 2

This is how I would do it using MySQL Triggers:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `test` (
  `testid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `test` text NOT NULL,
  `tuple` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`testid`),
  UNIQUE KEY `tuple` (`tuple`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=4 ;

INSERT INTO `test` (`testid`, `test`, `tuple`) VALUES
(2, 'whateversadfa jdsfj', 5),
(3, 'whaatasdfljsdflkj', 4);

DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS `PLUSONEA`;
DELIMITER //
CREATE TRIGGER `PLUSONEA` BEFORE INSERT ON `test`
 FOR EACH ROW SET NEW.tuple=(SELECT MAX(tuple)+1 FROM test)
//
DELIMITER ;

DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS `PLUSONEB`;
DELIMITER //
CREATE TRIGGER `PLUSONEB` BEFORE UPDATE ON `test`
 FOR EACH ROW SET NEW.tuple=(SELECT MAX(tuple)+1 FROM test)
//
DELIMITER ;

To test, do this:

UPDATE test SET test='hello' WHERE testid=2; # this would update tuple of testid=2 to 6
INSERT INTO test (test) VALUES ('hi'); # this would update tuple of testid=4 to 7
UPDATE test SET test='world' WHERE testid=3; # this would update tuple of testid=3 to 8
UPDATE test SET test='abc' WHERE testid=4; # this would update tuple of testid=4 to 9
share|improve this answer

I don't know if such methods exist but you can solve your problem by creating another table to store the updated tuples.And when the sync process runs let it delete the sync'd rows.

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How about the race condition problem? –  Greenback Boogie Jun 16 at 13:50
    
i'm nat an expert but, i don't think transaction from two tables cause race condition. after you update the tuple, you added the primary key of the updated tuple to the other table.so, there is two actions, might be slower but i don't see how race condition is occured. –  Amanuel Nega Jun 16 at 13:54

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