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I wrote this tiny code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    size_t temp;
    temp = 100;

    printf("lld=%lld, ld=%ld, u=%u\n", temp, temp, temp);

    return 0;
}

I am running this on a i386 GNU/Linux machine with gcc version 4.1.1 20070105 (Red Hat 4.1.1-52). This is the output that I got:

lld=429496729700, ld=100, u=7993461

I can understand that the first (lld) was printed as garbage because the printf tries to print 8 bytes (for signed long long as signified by lld) when only 4 bytes are available from variable temp. But, I fail to understand why the last identifier, u is getting printed as garbage - whereas, in my understanding this is the closest applicable identifier for size_t.

Here I have assumed that size_t is unsigned int (which is signed 4 bytes for my i386).

Now, I did a little tweaking with the printf line:

...
printf("ld=%ld, u=%u, lld=%lld\n", temp, temp, temp);
...

and I have a perfectly fine answer (except the lld part).

ld=100, u=100, lld=34331653576851556

Can someone please help me in understanding what exactly am I missing here?

Thanks a lot for any help!

[side note: I tried switching optimization using gcc -O[0,2] tag on/off without any difference in the observation.]

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The -Wformat option will probably detect this incompatibility for you. –  Clifford Mar 11 '10 at 12:29
    
@Clifford Thanks for the input - but, I was deliberately using wrong specifiers. I actually wanted to know how printf was consuming the elements on the stack. In fact, I think -Wall would have the same thing as well. Nevertheless, thanks a lot. –  Shrey Mar 13 '10 at 14:27
    
I realise that it was deliberate; but my point was that if the intention was to observe the compiler's behaviour, the -Wformat option demonstrates alternative (and safer) behaviour, which may have been of interest to someone, even if you were already aware of it. -Wall did not include -Wformat on older versions of GCC. –  Clifford Mar 14 '10 at 13:39
    
@Clifford Right .. I should have realized that. Thanks a lot for clarification. –  Shrey Mar 14 '10 at 16:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 21 down vote accepted

That's because what you've pushed on the stack is three 32-bit values and your format string tries to use four of them or, more accurately, one 64-bit value and two 32-bit values.

In the first case, the lld sucks up two 32-bit values, the ld sucks up the third one and the u gets whatever happens to be on the stack after that, which could really be anything.

When you change the order of the format specifiers in the string, it works differently because the ld sucks up the first 32-bit value, the u sucks up the second and the lld sucks up the third plus whatever happens to be on the stack after that. That's why you're getting different values, it's a data alignment/availability issue.

You can see this in action with the first value. 429496729700 is equal to (4294967296 + 1) * 100, i.e., (232+1)*100. Your code snippet

printf("lld=%lld, ld=%ld, u=%u\n", temp, temp, temp);

actually has the following effect:

What you pass     Stack     What printf() uses
-------------     -----     ------------------
                 +-----+
100              | 100 | \
                 +-----+  = 64-bit value for %lld.
100              | 100 | /
                 +-----+
100              | 100 |    32-bit value for %ld.
                 +-----+
                 | ?   |    32-bit value for %u (could be anything).
                 +-----+

In the second case

printf("ld=%ld, u=%u, lld=%lld\n", temp, temp, temp);

the following occurs:

What you pass     Stack     What printf() uses
-------------     -----     ------------------
                 +-----+
100              | 100 |    32-bit value for %ld.
                 +-----+
100              | 100 |    32-bit value for %u.
                 +-----+
100              | 100 | \
                 +-----+  = 64-bit value for %lld (could be anything).
                 | ?   | /
                 +-----+
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Yup, this sounds to perfectly the answer I was looking for. I read through the assembly code and it too does what you have mentioned (the part of pushing 3 variables of 32 byte on stack). I just could not confirm how printf was consuming them. Thanks for confirming! –  Shrey Mar 11 '10 at 12:00

Your code aptly demonstrates Undefined Behavior. Note that in case of variadic arguments no type checking is done for parameters. This is when an explicit cast becomes necessary. In fact the following should therefore be used:

 printf("lld=%lld, ld=%ld, u=%u\n", 
         (unsigned long long)temp, 
         (unsigned long)temp, 
         (unsigned int)temp);

As an aside remember the specifier for size_t is z. So:

 printf("zd=%zd\n", temp);
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You are passing to printf the wrong number of bytes. %lld requires a larger integer, in your case the way %lld taked its argument is completely messed up, since it would expect a 64-bit value.

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