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I have a single page web application designed to look like a desktop application using plain Jsp/Servlet. In the back end I have one servlet with action param being passed for various actions occurs on the single web page. 90% of the requests are ajax. When the functionality grows on the single web page there will be more actions exist under single servlet. Now my questions are

  • having single servlet to manage a lot of operations a good design? What would be the better design?

  • What is the performance benefit when having single vs multiple servlet?

  • Will the servlet code be unmanageable at one point when it grows?

For company policy reasons I can't use the spring mvc..

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You don't need spring to make separate servlets, so not being able to use spring is not a reason to not use multiple servlets. –  developerwjk Jun 16 '14 at 15:09
    
check if your org has anything against jsf, because its part of java ee, it may be acceptable –  Kalpesh Soni Jun 17 '14 at 15:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

having single servlet to manage a lot of operations a good design? What would be the better design?

No. A single class having basically all the responsibilities of your backend is not good design. Unless it only serves as a dispatcher to actions, but then you would reinvent the wheel that all the existing MVC frameworks have already invented for years (Spring MVC, etc.). Frankly, I would fight against the "company policy", and use the appropriate tool for the job: Spring MVC, or JAX-RS, or any other modern framework that can be used to easily implement a proper REST backend.

What is the performance benefit when having single vs multiple servlet?

None.

Will the servlet code be unmanageable at one point when it grows?

Yes. You'd better follow the REST principles and assign different URLs to your different actions instead of using a parameter to pass the action. Moreover, all actions should not use the same HTTP method. Searching or reading information should use GET, while creating stuff should use POST and updating stuff should use PUT.

And of course, use one servlet per URL.

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thanks all for the valuable suggestions here. –  Ram C Jun 17 '14 at 2:07

REST is the right approach as suggested by JB Nizet. Use JAX-RS for handling the request. In case you don't want to take that route, you can use a single servlet but use the servlet like a controller that send the request to different modules to handle it. Single servlet is fine as long as you don't put all the code in the same class.

In case you use multiple servlets, the design would get better when you plan to move one of the servlets to a different server. But with multiple servlets, the UI (html or java script) needs to handle routing to the right servlet

Code will be unmanageble only if you write everything in one servlet class... If designed correctly it should be manageable.

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you can use jsf

its a single servlet

called FacesServlet

--

jokes aside, you could use a single servlet, and create multiple classes to handle different scenarios and keep your servlet class under 100 lines of code with good design

but this is essentially writing mvc yourself

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Haha, nice joke. That's not what he means by one servlet though. You're just going to confuse the poor guy. –  developerwjk Jun 16 '14 at 15:12

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