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Can you please suggest to me the syntax for doing floating point comparison in a Bash script? I would ideally like to use it as part of an if statement. Here is a small code snippet :

key1="12.3"
result="12.2"

if (( $result <= $key1 ))
then
    # some code here
fi
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1  
Sounds like it's time to write that script in a different shell scripting language. You might like Python. – Roger Pate Mar 11 '10 at 12:22
1  
@Roger: don't underestimate bash, it's often a lot more powerful than people think.. except for, you know, dealing with floats.. :) – falstro Mar 11 '10 at 12:23
    
@Roger not really... – ghostdog74 Mar 11 '10 at 12:23
1  
@kiran, some shell like ksh/zsh supports floating point. otherwise, the next best thing is awk. (for shell scripting, its a very powerful tool), so learn to make use of it. – ghostdog74 Mar 11 '10 at 12:31
1  
@ghostdog: Not really how? Your accepted answer is all about using an additional language. – Roger Pate Mar 11 '10 at 12:32
up vote 9 down vote accepted

bash doesn't do floats, use awk

key1=12.3
result=12.5
var=$(awk 'BEGIN{ print "'$key1'"<"'$result'" }')    
# or var=$(awk -v key=$key1 -v result=$result 'BEGIN{print result<key?1:0}')
# or var=$(awk 'BEGIN{print "'$result'"<"'$key1'"?1:0}')
# or 
if [ "$var" -eq 1 ];then
  echo "do something"
else
  echo "result more than key"
fi

there are other shells that can do floats, like zsh or ksh, you might like to try using them as well

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1  
+1, or perl, or ... – falstro Mar 11 '10 at 12:22
    
Thanks GhostDog74, Your comments did help.. you have been a great support.. Thanks everyone – Kiran Mar 11 '10 at 12:28
2  
This looks like a rather awkward way to do it (no pun intended). – Sorpigal Mar 11 '10 at 12:37
    
I'm not 100% sure, but the double quotes in the awk expression result in awk acting weirdly, because, for example, awk 'BEGIN{ print "3.05">="20"} returns 1. After removing double quotes, it acts as expected. – zoldar Sep 23 '15 at 9:09

bc is your friend:

key1="12.3"
result="12.2"
if [ $(bc <<< "$result <= $key1") -eq 1 ]
    then
    # some code here
fi

Note the somewhat obscure here string (<<<) notation, as a nice alternative to echo "$result <= $key1" | bc.

Also, the un-bash-like bc prints 1 for true and 0 for false.

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Vow.. This is good.. – Kiran Mar 11 '10 at 12:32
1  
bc (or even dc) is good for this, and is certainly easier to read than the awk method, but doing it this way requires a subshell (or a pipe). In terms of efficiency expr is better and I find it easier to read, too. But still, +1 for bc! – Sorpigal Mar 11 '10 at 12:35
    
if what you meant by "easier to read than awk" means its shorter, that's because I am separating shell variables against awk variables. I can also write it like var=$(awk 'BEGIN{print "'$result'"<"'$key1'"?1:0}') – ghostdog74 Mar 11 '10 at 12:42
1  
Even if you do that it's quite verbose. Quotes inside quotes and a ternary operator? I'm sure you see what I mean. – Sorpigal Mar 11 '10 at 12:47

another simple clear way with bc is this:

if ((`bc <<< "10.21>12.22"`)); then echo "true"; else echo "false"; fi
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Using the exit() function of awk makes it almost readable.

key1=12.3
result=12.5

# the ! awk is because the logic in boolean tests 
# is the opposite of the one in shell exit code tests
if ! awk "{ exit ($result <= $key1) }" < /dev/null
then
        # some code here
fi

Note that there is not need to reuse the [ operator as if already uses the exit value.

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