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Ok so here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>

void convert_weight(int x , char a,  int* y, char* b)
{
    if (a == 'F')
        *y = (x-32) * 5 / 9;
        *b = 'C';

    if(a == 'C')
        *y = x*9 / 5 + 32;
        *b = 'F';
}

int main() 
{

  int degrees1 = 50, degrees2;
  char scale1 = 'F', scale2;
  convert_weight(degrees1, scale1, &degrees2, &scale2);
  printf("%d %c = %d %c\n", degrees1, scale1, degrees2, scale2);
  degrees1 = 10;
  scale1 = 'C';
  convert_weight(degrees1, scale1, &degrees2, &scale2);
  printf("%d %c = %d %c\n", degrees1, scale1, degrees2, scale2);
  return 0;

}

And here is the output:

50 F = 10 F
10 C = 50 F

Notice that my first line is returning 10 F instead of 10 C. I'm not quite sure why this is happening. If char a == 'F' then I'm attempting to set scale2 to be equal to 'C' via derefrencing, much like I did for degrees2 where it seems to have worked perfectly. I can't see the error in my code that's causing me to get 'F' for both of the outputs.

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closed as off-topic by Ryan Haining, Oliver Charlesworth, Andrew Medico, Michael Walz, Roombatron5000 Aug 21 '14 at 23:07

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Ryan Haining, Oliver Charlesworth, Andrew Medico, Michael Walz, Roombatron5000
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Previous Python programmer? You need braces; not enough to just indent. –  Jiminion Jun 16 '14 at 18:55
    
Ok ok! I changed it to 'convert_temp()' for my final final version. –  Daniel Love Jr Jun 16 '14 at 19:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're missing braces:

void convert_weight(int x , char a,  int* y, char* b)
{
    if (a == 'F')
    {
        *y = (x-32) * 5 / 9;
        *b = 'C';
    }

    if(a == 'C')
    {
        *y = x*9 / 5 + 32;
        *b = 'F';
    }
}

Without the braces, *b will always be 'F'.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh man, that was it... I changed it to a simple if-else just now, I been attempting to learn pointers and such all morning, I guess in my haste I just forgot how to make decent code lol. THANKS! –  Daniel Love Jr Jun 16 '14 at 18:56
1  
Indenting is a great aid in readability, but it can also mask logic errors. Sometimes a second pair of eyes is what you need. –  Fiddling Bits Jun 16 '14 at 18:58
2  
Also, why isn't it convert_temp() ? –  Jiminion Jun 16 '14 at 18:59
1  
@Jim lol. I totally missed that. –  Fiddling Bits Jun 16 '14 at 18:59
1  
@DanielLoveJr if a get weird errors relating to blocks of code, I often run a quick format of the code to do the indentation for me. If you do that with your original code, you will see that the first line under the if stays indented, while the second does not. when the indentation mismatches what you think it should be, it indicates a problem with your blocks. –  Ryan Haining Jun 16 '14 at 19:02

You forgot {} around your if() tests:

In the absence of any {}, only the FIRST line after the if() becomes the code to execute:

if (a == 'F')
    *y = (x-32) * 5 / 9;   // part of the IF
    *b = 'C';              // NOT part of the IF

So your *b = 'F' always executes, forcing you to report F always.

You want

if (a == 'F') {
    *y = (x-32) * 5 / 9;
    *b = 'C';
}

type code for both if() blocks.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to you as well! –  Daniel Love Jr Jun 16 '14 at 19:04

You need curly braces:

void convert_weight(int x , char a,  int* y, char* b)
{
    if (a == 'F') {
        *y = (x-32) * 5 / 9;
        *b = 'C';
    }
    if(a == 'C') {
        *y = x*9 / 5 + 32;
        *b = 'F';
    }
}

because else only the first statement is controlled by the if.

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2  
@glutton - No you don't –  Andrew Cooper Jun 16 '14 at 18:59
1  
No, void functions don't need return statements. –  alain Jun 16 '14 at 18:59
1  
@Gluttton no. you don't –  Ryan Haining Jun 16 '14 at 18:59

In first case you change passed variable two times. You need explicit exit from function after changes.

#include <stdio.h>

void convert_weight(int x , char a,  int* y, char* b)
{
    if (a == 'F') {
        *y = (x-32) * 5 / 9;
        *b = 'C';
        return;
    }

    if(a == 'C') {
        *y = x*9 / 5 + 32;
        *b = 'F';
        return;
    }
}

int main() 
{

  int degrees1 = 50, degrees2;
  char scale1 = 'F', scale2;
  convert_weight(degrees1, scale1, &degrees2, &scale2);
  printf("%d %c = %d %c\n", degrees1, scale1, degrees2, scale2);
  degrees1 = 10;
  scale1 = 'C';
  convert_weight(degrees1, scale1, &degrees2, &scale2);
  printf("%d %c = %d %c\n", degrees1, scale1, degrees2, scale2);
  return 0;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Asymetric return.... –  Jiminion Jun 16 '14 at 18:57
    
still needs braces around the second if. will produce undesired results if anything should be executed after both ifs. –  Ryan Haining Jun 16 '14 at 18:58

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