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Hello ladies and gentlemen,

I am currently working on iterative expansion algorithm that will form the basis for a project. The algorithm is given a seed URI, based on which it creates a graph in memory, by expanding step-by-step, keeping track of already visited nodes and a frontier of unexplored territory. To create this expansion, I have created two SPARQL templates that I feed URIs from the frontier into. The two simplified expressions are:

CONSTRUCT {?s ?p ?o}
WHERE {
    ?s ?p ?o .
    FILTER(?s IN (<URI_1>, <URI_2>,... <URI_N>)) .
    FILTERS....
}

and

CONSTRUCT {?s ?p ?o}
WHERE {
    ?s ?p ?o .
    FILTER(?o IN (<URI_1>, <URI_2>,... <URI_N>)) .
    FILTERS...
}

The first expression gets all triple in which the frontier nodes are subjects, and the second expression gets all triples in which the frontier nodes are objects. It should also be noted that I add in several filters, which have been left out for simplicities sake.

When I execute these queries, there is a rather large difference in execution time between statement one and two. Statement one is executed 3-6x faster than statement two, even though the statements are largely the same.

Could someone provide a hint as to why there is such a large discrepancy between the two queries? And even better, how query two might be restructured in order to attain better performance?

Thank you for your time and patience!

share|improve this question
4  
You haven't told us which SPARQL egine or triple store you're using. A possible cause is that the store you're executing over indexes on subjects but not on objects. It could also be that the second query simply returns a lot more results. But it's impossible to tell without knowing more about your specific setup. –  Jeen Broekstra Jun 16 at 23:43
1  
Also, a naive engine might actually do a filter for FILTER ( ?s in ... ), generating lots of triples first, and then filtering out results. You could use values ?s { ... } instead, which should be equivalent, but might be more efficient with a naive engine. It's worth trying anyhow. –  Joshua Taylor Jun 16 at 23:50
1  
@user2357906 How many triples are in each construct result? Also, what format are you getting the results back in? TTL and RDF/XML do support "pretty" formats that could take longer to write because properties and values for single subject can be grouped, but subjects and properties of a single object can't. So constructing the graphs probably uses roughly the same amount of time, but writing and sending the output could take much longer. How big is the actual response data you're getting back in each case? –  Joshua Taylor Jun 17 at 11:43
2  
E.g., the triples s p1 o1. s p1 o2. s p2 o3 can be written s p1 o1, o2 ; p2 o3 ., but s1 p1 o . s2 p1 o . s3 p2 o can't be cleaned up in TTL and RDF/XML. Using a format where each requires three lines (e.g., N-Triples) might make the difference go away. –  Joshua Taylor Jun 17 at 11:44
2  
I strongly advise that you test your queries through the DBpedia SPARQL query form, and not just through Jena. I would not expect the same issues you report with long query strings, nor the extreme difference between CONSTRUCT and SELECT query execution times. Whether my expectations play out or not, those tests should give you some clear paths to investigate going forward. –  TallTed Jul 3 at 5:32

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