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I have an existing perl script which I have to modify. For this, I need some struct-like container for my data. I do not have any 'outside' modules, nor do I possess the capability to obtain them, and my perl is 5.8.8. I've written a package containing one var and two arrays for my needs, however I cannot get it to work and I am not sure why. Here it is:

{
    package TestData;

    sub new
    {
        my $class = shift;
        my $self = {
          _id          => shift,
          _genUsers    => [],
          _testSymbols => [],
        };
        return bless ($self, $class);
    }

    sub setId
    {
        my ($self, $id) = @_;
        $self->{_id} = $id if defined($id);
    }

    sub addGenUser
    {
        my ($self, $user) = @_;
        push @{$self->{_genUsers}}, $user;
    }

    sub addTestSymbol
    {
        my ($self, $sym) = @_;
        push @{$self->{_testSymbols}}, $sym;
    }

    sub getId
    {
        my $self = @_;
        return $self->{_id};
    }

    sub getGenUserList
    {
        my $self = @_;
        return @{$self->{_genUsers}};
    }

    sub getTestSymbolList
    {
        my $self = @_;
        return @{$self->{_testSymbols}};
    }
}

use strict;
use POSIX;

my $id = "test";

my @a;
push @a, "this";

my @b;
push @b, "that";


my $obj = new TestData($id, @a, @b);
print "DEBUG: " . $obj->getId() . "\n";

Last line always throws "use of uninitialized value". What's going on?

Also would it be possible to do something like this:

my @c;
push @c, $obj;
foreach(@c){
    print "DEBUG2: " . $_->getId() . "\n";
}

Thank you.

EDIT: Thank you everyone for your replies. This is what the fully working end result looked like:

{
    use strict;
    use POSIX;

    package TestData;

    sub new
    {
        my $class = shift;
        my $self = {
          _alpha        => shift,
          _beta         => shift,
          _gamma        => shift,
          _delta        => shift,
          _theta        => shift
        };
        return bless ($self, $class);
    }

    sub getAlpha
    {
        my $self = shift;
        return $self->{_alpha};
    }

    sub getBeta
    {
        my $self = shift;
        return $self->{_beta};
    }

    sub getGamma
    {
        my $self = shift;
        return $self->{_gamma};
    }

    sub getDelta
    {
        my $self = shift;
        return $self->{_delta};
    }

    sub getTheta
    {
        my $self = shift;
        return $self->{_theta};
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
The code you've posted does not compile. Your opening brace is backwards, and you've missed a $ in my id. Please fix your code so that it compiles. –  Diab Jerius Jun 16 '14 at 20:48
1  
Done. Thank you. –  S.T.A.L.K.E.R. Jun 16 '14 at 20:49
1  
The usefulness of your Perl installation is very limited if you cannot make use of additional library modules: one of Perl's major strengths is the huge amount of code that the community has made available for free. What is the reason that you can't use non-core modules? Is it a policy decision by the company you work for, or do you simply not know how to do it? –  Borodin Jun 17 '14 at 2:01
    
"I do not have any 'outside' modules, nor do I possess the capability to obtain them, and my perl is 5.8.8." - you should really work on fixing those problems first :-) –  Dave Cross Jun 17 '14 at 9:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The bug is in the line(s) that read:

my $self = @_;

This is a scalar assignment, and so assigns the length on @_ to $self. Trying to use the length as a hash reference then gives the "use of uninitialized value" warning you see, and returns undef.

By the way, in addition to enabling warnings, you should get into the habit of starting all your scripts and modules with use strict;. If you'd done that, it would've caught this bug, and you would've received a runtime error saying something like:

Can't use string ("1") as a HASH ref while "strict refs" in use at foo.pl line 36.

Anyway, to fix your code, you should replace the line above with either:

my ($self) = @_;

or:

my $self = shift;

or even:

my $self = $_[0];

With my ($self) = @_ the parentheses turn it into a list assignment; with my $self = shift it's still a scalar assignment, but shift (which, inside a sub, is shorthand for shift @_) pulls the first scalar out of @_.

The choice of which style to prefer basically comes down to personal taste and consistency; if you're used to pulling all your method args out of @_ with a single assignment like:

my ($self, $foo, $bar, $baz) = @_;

then, for methods that take no arguments other than $self, a single-element list assignment seems more consistent. On the other hand, if you prefer to pick your args out of @_ one at a time, as in:

my $self = shift;
my $foo  = shift;
my $bar  = shift;
my $baz  = shift;

the you obviously should follow that pattern for single-arg methods too.

share|improve this answer
1  
The OP did use strict, but not until after the block which defines the TestData package, so it only applied to the procedural code at the end, not to the package definition. Which is why use strict should generally be the very first line of Perl code in the file. –  Dave Sherohman Jun 17 '14 at 8:30

Change

my $self = @_;

to

my $self = shift;

in your methods that only expect one argument and especifically the called one (i.e.):

  sub getId
    {
        my $self = shift;
        return $self->{_id};
    }

You can also wrap the $self around parentheses to change context and do the same thing as commented

Output:

DEBUG: test
share|improve this answer
2  
+1. my ($self) = @_;, with parentheses around $self, would also work (because the parens make it a list assignment), but my $self = @_; assigns the length of @_ to $self (because without them it's a scalar assignment, and an array in scalar context evaluates to its length). –  Ilmari Karonen Jun 16 '14 at 20:58

Rather than roll your own, you might want to check out Class::Struct, which has been part of Perl's core since 5.4.

share|improve this answer
    
Cannot use it. The Perl @inc cannot find it, and I'm not sure why since I didn't set up my machine. –  S.T.A.L.K.E.R. Jun 16 '14 at 21:17
    
What OS are you running? –  Diab Jerius Jun 17 '14 at 19:53

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