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I have some read-only properties that return a value based on sibling properties within the view-model. In order to bind them to the XAML I need to add extra RaisePropertyChanged events to the sibling properties. This feels a little inelegant.

A simplified example:

public bool IsPurchased
{
    get
    {
        return _IsPurchased;
    }
    set
    {
        if (_IsPurchased == value) return;
        _IsPurchased = value;
        RaisePropertyChanged("IsPurchased");
        RaisePropertyChanged("IsAvailableToUse");
    }
}
private bool _IsPurchased = false;

public bool IsDownloaded
{
    get
    {
        return _IsDownloaded;
    }
    set
    {
        if (_IsDownloaded == value) return;
        _IsDownloaded = value;
        RaisePropertyChanged("IsDownloaded");
        RaisePropertyChanged("IsAvailableToUse");
    }
}
private bool _IsDownloaded = false;

public bool IsAvailableToUse
{
    get
    {
        return IsPurchased && IsDownloaded;
    }
}

Does anyone have a nice pattern that will do away with the extra RaisePropertyChanged("IsAvailableToUse")'s within the contributing properties themselves and make such scenarios easier to manage? Perhaps adding these sorts of mappings in a centralized place within the view-model.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As far as I know that pattern is fairly common in MVVM. If you want to group all the properties together you could override your implementation of RaisePropertyChanged to handle grouped cases in the following way.

   protected override void RaisePropertyChanged(string propertyName = null)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = this.PropertyChangedHandler;
        switch (propertyName)
        {
            case "IsDownloaded":
            case "IsAvailableToUse":
            case "IsPurchased":
                if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("IsDownloaded"));
                if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("IsAvailableToUse"));
                if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("IsPurchased"));

                break;
            default:
                if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
                break;
        }
    }

On an unrelated note, I noticed one of your properties is named "IsAvailableToUse" and seems like that property may be a switch for a command binding. If you're enabling/disabling a button based on this boolean value then I'd recommend declaring an ICommand and CanExecute. It can be more elegant since buttons have this useful and elegant feature built in by the framework.

share|improve this answer
    
Very much appreciated, I'll give it a whirl soon! (it's for a pet project I only get to throw spare hours at) Regarding buttons - I actually have 4 in this case: "Purchase", "Download", "Cancel Download" & "Delete" so I'm using the properties to hide all but the relevant button so I'm not sure ICommand and CanExecute is relevant in this case? Screenshot [ cdn.marketplaceimages.windowsphone.com/v8/images/… ]. But I do use boolean values elsewhere to disable/enable buttons so I'll investigate this suggestion as well. Thank you. –  Gavin Jun 17 '14 at 1:18
    
Hmmm... doesn't quite work for me. I guess it may be because I'm using MVVM Light. Following the same pattern on MVVM Light's "RaisePropertyChanged". For the line "PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged" I get the following error "The event 'GalaSoft.MvvmLight.ObservableObject.PropertyChanged' can only appear on the left hand side of += or -=". Any ideas why I can't grab the handler? –  Gavin Jun 18 '14 at 10:50
    
I downloaded mvvm light and updated the answer witih code that should work. –  Bryan Stump Jun 18 '14 at 11:48

Have a look at this https://github.com/steinborge/ProxyTypeHelper . It would do your MVVM/WPF and automatically wire up propertychangedevents. So your example would like this:

    public bool IsDownloaded {get;set;}
    public bool IsPurchased { get; set; }

    [LinkToProperty("IsDownloaded")]
    [LinkToProperty("IsPurchased")]
    public bool IsAvailableToUse
    {
        get
        {
            return IsPurchased && IsDownloaded;
        }
    }

    [LinkToCommand("PurchaseCommand")]
    private void btnPurchase()
    {
    }

    [LinkToCommand("DownloadCommand")]
    private void btnDownload()
    {
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I voted this up as I love the solution, but other answer is compatible with MVVM Light. –  Gavin Jun 20 '14 at 1:51
    
I like this solution too. –  Bryan Stump Jun 21 '14 at 1:08

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