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I've got two tables: AP and table AP supervisory visits, with a one-many relationship respectively. AP supervisory visits has no primary key or unique index (so it can be a bit hard to work with) and the function "IN()" is not having an easy time with it.

Table AP:

+------------------------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field                        | Type        | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+------------------------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| HID                          | varchar(50) | NO   | PRI | NULL    |       |
| yr                           | varchar(50) | NO   | PRI | NULL    |       |
| mo                           | varchar(50) | NO   | PRI | NULL    |       |

Table AP supervisory visits:

+------------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field            | Type        | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+------------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| HID              | varchar(50) | YES  | MUL | NULL    |       |
| yr               | varchar(50) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| mo               | varchar(50) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| exported         | datetime    | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| visitor name     | varchar(50) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| title            | varchar(50) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| reason for visit | varchar(50) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| number of visits | int(11)     | YES  | MUL | 0       |       |
+------------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+-------+

I've got about 8000 records in AP and 1700 unique records (using HID, yr, mo) in AP supervisory visits. I would like all the records in the AP table that have no 'children' in the AP supervisory visits table. Using other articles on Stakeoverflow I came to the conclusion I should use "NOT IN()". This works on a few of my tables with similar relationships, but not this time (note the last query is the inverse, it lacks the NOT):

mysql> SELECT HID, yr, mo FROM AP
    -> WHERE (HID, yr, mo) NOT IN(SELECT HID, yr, mo FROM `AP supervisory visits`);
Empty set (0.34 sec)

mysql> SELECT HID, yr, mo FROM AP
    -> WHERE (HID, yr, mo) NOT IN(SELECT DISTINCT HID, yr, mo FROM `AP supervisory visits`);
Empty set (0.47 sec)

mysql> SELECT HID, yr, mo FROM AP
    -> WHERE (HID, yr, mo) NOT IN(SELECT DISTINCT * FROM (SELECT DISTINCT HID, yr, mo FROM `AP supervisory visits`) AS temp);
Empty set (3.04 sec)

mysql> SELECT HID, yr, mo FROM AP
    -> WHERE (HID, yr, mo) IN(SELECT DISTINCT HID, yr, mo FROM `AP supervisory visits`) LIMIT 5;
+-----+------+----+
| HID | yr   | mo |
+-----+------+----+
| 109 | 2011 | 03 |
| 109 | 2012 | 05 |
| 109 | 2012 | 06 |
| 110 | 2010 | 11 |
| 110 | 2010 | 12 |
+-----+------+----+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

I've since created a temporary table with all the distinct combinations of HID, yr, mo, but I would rather do without temporary tables altogether. The third query above should be creating a temporary table within memory with distinct values (It is ugly I know) but it doesn't seem to be the case.

My 'temporary solution':

mysql> CREATE TABLE myTempAPSup SELECT DISTINCT HID, yr, mo FROM `AP supervisory visits`;
mysql> ALTER TABLE myTempAPSup ADD PRIMARY KEY(HID, yr, mo);
mysql> SELECT HID, yr, mo FROM AP
    -> WHERE (HID, yr, mo) NOT IN (SELECT HID, yr, mo FROM myTempAPSup) LIMIT 5;
+-----+------+----+
| HID | yr   | mo |
+-----+------+----+
| 109 | 2010 | 01 |
| 109 | 2012 | 01 |
| 109 | 2012 | 02 |
| 109 | 2012 | 03 |
| 109 | 2012 | 04 |
+-----+------+----+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Is there a way to get the rows with no 'children' from such a badly made table? I've assumed my troubles stem from the lack of unique/primary keys, but am I missing some other syntactical 'gotcha'?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you come from an Oracle background, the idea of a left join, and then checking for null may seem weird. That solution is wicked fast though, as you're not scanning through every record in the joined table. Another approach would be to use a correlated subquery with the not exists clause.

SELECT a.HID
     , a.yr
     , a.mo 
  FROM AP a
 WHERE NOT EXISTS (
       SELECT v.HID
         FROM `AP supervisory visits` v
        WHERE v.HID = a.HID
          AND v.yr  = a.yr
          AND v.mo  = a.mo
 )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Chaka, almost works, just replace ap.HID with v.HID (StackOF won't let me make the edit as it is too few characters). I'm confused though how exists() knows to check all three columns for a match if we are just selecting for HID. (I've run the query and it indeed pulls back the same number of results as the LEFT JOINs above). –  Timothy Harding Jun 17 at 2:40
    
Looks like EXISTS() is a simple true/not true for the columns mentioned in the query at the top. The SELECT statement is inconsequential. This works best of all the solutions offered, as I can stack these for multiple child tables. Sadly, it is incredibly CPU intensive, but does not require making any changes to the database to work. Thanks again Chaka: –  Timothy Harding Jun 17 at 3:07
    
"Looks like EXISTS() is a simple true/not true for the columns mentioned in the query at the top. " no that's not true. Instead WHERE v.HID = a.HID AND v.yr = a.yr AND v.mo = a.mo defines which columns to check. Try adding non-unique index on these three columns on both tables and check performance again. –  Ruslan Bes Jun 17 at 12:16

You can use a LEFT JOIN and check if there is a child record, which is null when it does not exist.

select a.HID, a.yr, a.mo
from AP a
left join `AP supervisory visits` b on a.HID = b.HID and a.yr = b.yr and a.mo = b.mo
where b.yr is null;
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Here's one way to get rows from AP that have no "matching" row in AP supervisory visits:

SELECT a.HID
     , a.yr
     , a.mo 
  FROM AP a
  LEFT
  JOIN `AP supervisory visits` v
    ON v.HID = a.HID
   AND v.yr  = a.yr
   AND v.mo  = a.mo
 WHERE v.HID IS NULL

This is a left outer join, to get all rows from AP, along with matching rows from AP supervisory visits. The "trick" is the predicate in the WHERE clause... we're excluding all rows that had a match. (We're checking a column that we know will be non-NULL if there was a match; the only way that columns will be NULL is if there wasn't a match.

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