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I have a template class that looks like this:

template <typename T>
class Foo {
public:
  enum Mode { Mode1, Mode2, Mode3 };
  // ...
};

I instantiate this:

Foo<float> foo;
// ...
auto m = Foo<float>::Mode1;

But it seems to me an unnecessary redundancy to include a source dependency on the type I used when instantiating the Foo template. The classic solution would be a typedef on the entire type:

typedef Foo<float> FooType;
FooType foo;
// ...
auto m = FooType::Mode1;

But it seems to me that the compiler ought to be able to derive the type from the actual instance variable. So something like this instead:

Foo<float> foo;
// ...
typedef decltype(foo) FooType;
auto m = FooType::Mode1;

This compiles. What puzzles me is why I cannot do the last part as a single expression:

auto m = typename decltype(foo)::Mode1;

This results in the compiler error "Expected '(' for function-style cast or type construction".

The reason why I want to do this at all is because I have substantially more template parameters than just T and while the top-level typedef is probably the most sensible solution I'd like to know why my use of decltype on a single line doesn't work.

I'm using Clang 3.0 and I'm not able to use -std=c++11 so I only have use of the default C++ features in Clang 3.0. Unfortunately I can't use enum classes in this version.

share|improve this question
    
decltype is a C++11 feature, and so is that use of auto. –  ghostofstandardspast Jun 17 at 1:04
    
@ghostofstandardspast yes, I have access to the default C++ features in Clang 3.0, which includes some C++11 features such as auto and decltype. I just can't turn on -std=c++11 as this is a custom third-party Clang build that has this option disabled. –  meowsqueak Jun 17 at 5:14
    
That seems very confusing. It seems to me that it should either be defaulted to C++11 with all the features the compiler has, or defaulted to an older standard with no C++11 features unless you have the option. –  ghostofstandardspast Jun 17 at 13:20

2 Answers 2

This works for me, using g++ 4.8.2.

template <typename T>
class Foo {
public:
  enum Mode { Mode1, Mode2, Mode3 };
};

int main()
{
   Foo<float> foo;
   auto m = decltype(foo)::Mode1;
}

The additional typename is the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually get the same error message with or without typename so I left it in as I wasn't sure if it would be necessary. –  meowsqueak Jun 17 at 5:13
    
I had to use the -std=c++11 flag for it to work. –  R Sahu Jun 17 at 6:54

You are using decltype, which is a feature that has been introduced in C++11, therefore it is not possible to use it in C++03.

Fortunately decltype has been introduced in Clang 2.9 (just like auto) and is available by using -std=c++11 or -std=c++0x.

Your code compiles just fine using C++11:

template <typename T>
class Foo {
public:
  enum Mode { Mode1, Mode2, Mode3 };
  // ...
};


int main() {
    Foo<float> foo;
    // ...
    auto m = decltype(foo)::Mode1;
}

Live demo

share|improve this answer
    
Is C++03 the default dialect for Clang 3.0? –  meowsqueak Jun 17 at 5:17
    
So the problem may be partial support for decltype then? Given that the keyword is recognised and does work in the two-line version, it's plausible that its use in the one-line version simply isn't supported - perhaps erroneous to assume that decltype "returns" a type in this version of the compiler (otherwise decltype(foo)::Mode1 would work)? –  meowsqueak Jun 17 at 7:11

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