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There are two ways to overload operators for a C++ class:

Inside class

class Vector2
{
public:
    float x, y ;

    Vector2 operator+( const Vector2 & other )
    {
        Vector2 ans ;
        ans.x = x + other.x ;
        ans.y = y + other.y ;
        return ans ;
    }
} ;

Outside class

class Vector2
{
public:
    float x, y ;
} ;

Vector2 operator+( const Vector2& v1, const Vector2& v2 )
{
    Vector2 ans ;
    ans.x = v1.x + v2.x ;
    ans.y = v1.y + v2.y ;
    return ans ;
}

(Apparently in C# you can only use the "outside class" method.)

In C++, which way is more correct? Which is preferable?

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1  
Did you mean for the member operator+ to be non-const as this gives the non-member function a head start in 'correcterness' as it will work in more situations? –  Charles Bailey Mar 11 '10 at 15:11
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/5532991/… also has some answers –  user247077 Feb 3 '13 at 15:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

The basic question is "do you want conversions to be performed on the left-hand side parameter of an operator?". If yes, use a free function. If no, use a class member.

For example, for operator+() for strings, we want conversions to be performed so we can say things like:

string a = "bar";
string b = "foo" + a;

where a conversion is performed to turn the char * "foo" into a std::string. So we make operator+() for strings into a free function.

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12  
So if you used the member function version, you COULD NOT have "foo" + a, but you could have a + "foo" –  bobobobo Mar 11 '10 at 15:01
    
@bobobobo Exactly so. –  anon Mar 11 '10 at 15:02
    
@Roger, aww you are fast. I already deleted my comment right away since it wasn't on-topic. Your barton-nackman trickery looks neat, didn't think of that at all xD –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 11 '10 at 15:22
    
There are implications for how you declare the non-member operators for templates, compare codepad.org/ACNeZcCf vs codepad.org/3jbvxRN9. The former is called en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barton-Nackman_trick. –  Roger Pate Mar 11 '10 at 15:23
    
@Roger, now this comment thread looks fun. Some reverse_iterator rushed over it :) I agree, this is a problem with std::string too. You can't do std::string s; s = s + +'a'; and expect 'a' to be added since the second argument expects CharT but it deduces to int oO I was about to recommend identity<CharT>::type as the parameter, so it doesn't participate in deduction, but your friend function beats it all xD –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 11 '10 at 15:26

First: the two different ways are really "overload as a member" and "overload as a non-member", and the latter has two different ways to write it (as-friend-inside class definition and outside class definition). Calling them "inside class" and "outside class" is going to confuse you.


Overloads for +=, +, -=, -, etc. have a special pattern:

struct Vector2 {
  float x, y;
  Vector2& operator+=(Vector2 const& other) {
    x += other.x;
    y += other.y;
    return *this;
  }
  Vector2& operator-=(Vector2 const& other) {
    x -= other.x;
    y -= other.y;
    return *this;
  }
};
Vector2 operator+(Vector2 a, Vector2 const& b) {
  // note 'a' is passed by value and thus copied
  a += b;
  return a;
}
Vector2 operator-(Vector2 a, Vector2 const& b) { return a -= b; } // compact

This pattern allows the conversions mentioned in the other answers for the LHS argument while simplifying the implementation considerably. (Either member or non-member allows conversions for the RHS when it's passed either as a const& or by value, as it should be.) Of course, this only applies when you do actually want to overload both += and +, -= and -, etc., but that is still common.


Additionally, you sometimes want to declare your non-member op+, etc. as friends within the class definition using the Barton-Nackman trick, because due to quirks of templates and overloading, it may not be found otherwise.

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But if you pass a by reference, Vector2& operator+=( Vector2& a, const Vector2& b ), you could achieve the same end –  bobobobo Mar 11 '10 at 15:06
1  
@bobobobo: Op+= often needs access to non-public members, and in that case it's easier to make it a member than a friend. Op= must be a member and it's also convenient to group +=, -=, etc. with op=. –  Roger Pate Mar 11 '10 at 15:20

There is an excellent discussion of this issue in Meyer's Effective C++: Item 24 is "Declare non-member functions when type conversions should apply to all parameters" and Item 46 is "Define non-member functions inside templates when type conversions are desired".

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