Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Coding i came around to check for the vararg performance of Java.

I write following test code:

public class T {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int n = 100000000;
        String s1 = new String("");
        String s2 = new String("");
        String s3 = new String("");
        String s4 = new String("");
        String s5 = new String("");

        long t = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            foo();
        }
        System.err.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - t);


        t = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            baz(s1, s2, s3, s4, s5);
        }
        System.err.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - t);

        t = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            bar(s1, s2, s3, s4, s5);
        }
        System.err.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - t);

    }

    static void foo() {
    }

    static void bar(String a1, String a2, String a3, String a4, String a5) {
    }

    static void baz(String... a) {
    }
}

On my machine the average output is:

78
4696
78

Seems that pass variables to methods is at no cost ?! Good !

But using varags is 60x slower ! Why ?

An explanation could be that the program must create the array on the heap and the time is spend by GC. But for less loops i still get as output:

0
62
0

What is spending this extra time for and anyway the compiler has all information to resolve this to a fix variable call ...

Its not my intention to optimize for that, but i found this curious ...

Update

I added a new test

t = System.currentTimeMillis();
for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    baz(s1);
}
System.err.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - t);

And this one argument version is still 30x slower. Maybe there is an ArrayList.toArray() behind the scene ?

So be aware of no-needed varags methods in your code and refactor to fix length. That could be a perfomance boost.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Static list of arguments is quite different from an array. When you pass them that way, compiler reserves space for the references and populates them when the method is called.

Varargs is an equivalent of array. To call such a method, it's necessary to create and populate array at run time. That's why you observe the difference.

String[] and String... are synonyms. If you compared them, you should see identical performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Yup, it will be the same, as varargs are syntactic sugar transformed into array calls before effective compilation. –  Riduidel Mar 11 '10 at 16:00
    
This is basically right though I think you should clarify that the difference is that varargs requires the JVM to allocate and populate an array. Whether it's on the heap or stack isn't quite the issue (though yes of course it's on the heap). –  Sean Owen Mar 12 '10 at 9:47
    
@Sean Owen Thanks, updated. –  Konrad Garus Mar 12 '10 at 9:59
    
All absolutely true, but I am still disappointed. I would imagine that with some escape analysis, hotspot could figure out that the array is never retained, and it does not need to be allocated in (and GCd off) the heap. Also seems like the sort of optimization that can be done even at compile time in this case, since baz(...) is not 'virtual', and doesn't iterate over the array. –  Dilum Ranatunga May 7 '13 at 17:46

Using both the latest JRE6 and JRE7 I get different results than yours and they indicate that varargs are 5 times faster:

69
69
311

However, I would not jump to conclusions because this benchmark has several flaws: the parameters are not used in the function; the function doesn't do anything; the arguments have the same value. JIT can easily optimize this code and inline function calls. I modified your example to address the aforementioned obvious problems and got the following results:

627
7470
7844

The conclusion is: don't hesitate to use varargs. If your function is trivial then its call be inlined by the JIT, and if it's not then the overhead of varargs will likely be negligible.

share|improve this answer

Interesting problem !

This is just a guess : behind the scenes, Var-args are just arrays. Creating this implicit array and populating it with the var-args parameters may take some time; hence the performance hit. Well, I guess.

share|improve this answer

As said, an array is maintained when using var-args...,

you should also try to see the influence of adding "final" to the parameters of every methods

i personally get an improvement from 2250 -> 2234 ms for the array.

share|improve this answer
    
Parameters in Java really can't be made final, they can still be changed, so this shouldn't influence anything. –  helpermethod Mar 11 '10 at 17:00
    
How can a final parameter be changed? –  Hardcoded Mar 12 '10 at 8:33
    
final arguments and variables can't be changed. I think the point is better stated thus: making an object reference final means you can't change the reference, but it does not mean the object it refers to can't change state. –  Sean Owen Mar 12 '10 at 9:46
    
in other words, for primitive types you can't change them, for objects use setters or change its public members. –  ssaboum Mar 13 '10 at 13:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.