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I am trying to compare two files, A and C, in Python and for some reason the double for loop doesn't seem to work properly:

with open(locationA + filenameC,'r') as fileC, open(locationA + filenameA,'r') as fileA:
     for lineC in fileC:
         fieldC = lineC.split('#')
         for lineA in fileA:
             fieldA = lineA.split('#')
             print 'UserID Clicks' + fieldC[0]
             print 'UserID Activities' + fieldA[0]
             if (fieldC[0] == fieldA[0]) and (fieldC[2] == fieldA[2]):
                 print 'OK'

Here, only the line of C seems to be compared, but for the other lines, the "A loop" seems to be ignored.

Can anyone help me with this?

share|improve this question
2  
The difflib module? – g.d.d.c Jun 17 '14 at 15:42
2  
Once you reach the end of fileA in the inner loop on the first iteration of the outer loop, the pointer is at the end of the file. Subsequent attempts to iterate over the file won't do anything. – jonrsharpe Jun 17 '14 at 15:44
1  
@jonrsharpe is right about the cause of your problem. You need fileA.seek(0) to reset your handle. – g.d.d.c Jun 17 '14 at 15:45
    
os.system('diff ' + filenameA + ' ' + filenameB).... ok, ok, just joking – brechmos Jun 17 '14 at 15:52
    
Do you really want to compare every line in A with every line in C? And make each comparison twice? – Stuart Jun 17 '14 at 16:48

Your problem is that once you iterate over fileA once you need to change the pointer to the beginning of the file again. So what you might do is create two lists from both files and iterate over them as many times as you want. For example:

fileC_list = fileC.readlines()
fileA_list = fileA.readlines()
for lineC in fileC_list:
  # do something
  for lineA in fileA_list:
    # do somethins
share|improve this answer
    
Better might be to do fileA.seek(0) at the beginning of the first for block. – cwallenpoole Jun 17 '14 at 16:11
    
Thank you cwallenpoole, it worked this way. – user2506015 Jun 18 '14 at 14:46

The problem with nested loops (from the point of view of your current problem) is precisely that the inner loop runs to completion for each iteration of the outer loop. So instead, set lineA by calling for the next item from the fileA iterator explicitly:

with open(locationA + filenameC,'r') as fileC, open(locationA + filenameA,'r') as fileA:
     for lineC in fileC:
         fieldC = lineC.split('#')
         lineA = next(fileA)
         fieldA = lineA.split('#')
         print 'UserID Clicks' + fieldC[0]
         print 'UserID Activities' + fieldA[0]
         if (fieldC[0] == fieldA[0]) and (fieldC[2] == fieldA[2]):
             print 'OK'

This logic will ignore any extra lines from fileA once fileC is exhausted, and if fileC contains more lines than FileA things might also get ugly without special checks.

A different approach might use itertools.izip() to collect lines from each file in pairs:

import itertools
with open(locationA + filenameC,'r') as fileC, open(locationA + filenameA,'r') as fileA:
for lineC, lineA in itertools.izip(fileC, fileA):
         fieldC = lineC.split('#')
         fieldA = lineA.split('#')
         print 'UserID Clicks' + fieldC[0]
         print 'UserID Activities' + fieldA[0]
         if (fieldC[0] == fieldA[0]) and (fieldC[2] == fieldA[2]):
             print 'OK'

I can't think of any specific reason to use one instead of the other, but if the files are of any size at all refuse the temptation to use the builtin zip() function instead of itertools.izip() - the former returns a list, and so memory usage depends on file sizes, whereas the latter is a generator, and so creates values as they are required.

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You are comparing all lines from FileA to each line from FileC. That means, for each line of File C, you will read the entire FileA, and (provided you do move the pointer to the beginning of the File A), you would read it again, and again.

It is easier to read them both at the same time while they both have lines if they are the same, do something, read from both

if they are different, read from the smallest (Line A < Line C, read from File A only; Line C < Line A, read from Line C only)

and make two last loops while there are remaining lines (two loops, one for each file, as you do not know which one ran out of lines)

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