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This should really be allowed - I do not understand why it is not.

SELECT * 
FROM (
    SELECT * 
    FROM MyTable
)
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1  
If you post code or XML - please always highlight the lines in question and click on the "code" button (101 010) on the editor toolbar! That makes it just soooo much easier and nicer to read! –  marc_s Mar 11 '10 at 16:45
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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In SQL Server it is allowed, but the inner select has to be given a name, such as:

SELECT *  
FROM ( 
    SELECT *  
    FROM MyTable
) m

When a name is not supplied it will throw an incorrect syntax error near ')' message.

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If you add a table alias it should work:

SELECT * 
FROM (
    SELECT * 
    FROM MyTable
) as A
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+1: Looks like you win by 28 seconds. –  RedFilter Mar 11 '10 at 18:09
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You are missing an 'alias' on the sub-query (I added an alias 'X' )

SELECT * 
FROM (
    SELECT * 
    FROM MyTable
) X
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There are at least two ways to accomplish this, but what you might be looking for is a Common Table Expression (CTE), introduced in SQL Server 2005.

From the above link:

USE AdventureWorks;
GO
WITH Sales_CTE (SalesPersonID, NumberOfOrders, MaxDate)
AS
(
    SELECT SalesPersonID, COUNT(*), MAX(OrderDate)
    FROM Sales.SalesOrderHeader
    GROUP BY SalesPersonID
)
SELECT E.EmployeeID, OS.NumberOfOrders, OS.MaxDate,
    E.ManagerID, OM.NumberOfOrders, OM.MaxDate
FROM HumanResources.Employee AS E
    JOIN Sales_CTE AS OS
    ON E.EmployeeID = OS.SalesPersonID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Sales_CTE AS OM
    ON E.ManagerID = OM.SalesPersonID
ORDER BY E.EmployeeID;
GO

Alternately, you can create a View, which is a permanent table-shaped representation of a query that you can access by name:

USE AdventureWorks ;
GO
IF OBJECT_ID ('hiredate_view', 'V') IS NOT NULL
DROP VIEW hiredate_view ;
GO
CREATE VIEW hiredate_view
AS 
SELECT c.FirstName, c.LastName, e.EmployeeID, e.HireDate
FROM HumanResources.Employee e JOIN Person.Contact c on e.ContactID = c.ContactID ;
GO
SELECT * FROM hiredate_view
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-1: You don't need a view or CTE to do this, it's a standard subquery. –  RedFilter Mar 11 '10 at 18:07
    
@OrbMan, the OP's code does not use a subquery. a subquery is a SELECT query that returns a single value and is nested inside a SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE statement, or inside another subquery. A subquery can be used anywhere an expression is allowed. the OP uses a derived table, which is sometimes called an inline view. –  KM. Mar 23 '10 at 17:29
    
@KM - you are correct. I have lazily fallen into the habit of using the name subquery for any query in brackets, but derived table is the proper term, and what I really meant. –  RedFilter Mar 23 '10 at 18:01
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