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I'm using ctypes to work with a library written in C. This C library allows me to register a callback function, which I'm implementing in Python.

Here is the callback function type, according to the ctypes API:

_command_callback = CFUNCTYPE(
    UNCHECKED(c_int),
    POINTER(vedis_context),
    c_int,
    POINTER(POINTER(vedis_value)))

Here is a decorator I've written to mark a function as a callback:

def wrap_callback(fn):
    return _command_callback(fn)

To use this, I am able to simply write:

@wrap_callback
def my_callback(*args):
    print args
    return 1  # Needed by C library to indicate OK response.

c_library_func.register_callback(my_callback)

I can now invoke my callback (my_callback) from C and this works perfectly well.

The problem I'm encountering is that there will be some boilerplate behavior I would like to perform as part of these callbacks (such as returning a success flag, etc). To minimize boilerplate, I tried to write a decorator:

def wrap_callback(fn):
    def inner(*args, **kwargs):
        return fn(*args, **kwargs)
    return _command_callback(inner)

Note that this is functionally equivalent to the previous example.

@wrap_callback
def my_callback(*args):
    print args
    return 1

When I attempt to invoke the callback using this approach, however, I receive the following exception, originating from _ctypes/callbacks.c:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "_ctypes/callbacks.c", line 314, in 'calling callback function'
  File "/home/charles/tmp/scrap/z1/src/vedis/vedis/core.py", line 28, in inner
    return fn(*args, **kwargs)
SystemError: Objects/cellobject.c:24: bad argument to internal function

I am not sure what is going on here that would cause the first example to work but the second example to fail. Can anyone shed some light on this? Bonus points if you can help me find a way to decorate these callbacks so I can reduce boilerplate code!

share|improve this question
    
inner.__closure__ is a tuple with a cell that contains a reference to fn. This cell gets loaded in the evaluation frame. To get at the reference in the cell, the opcode LOAD_DEREF calls PyCell_Get. The error you're getting means PyCell_Get was called with a junk pointer that doesn't point at a cell. That means the __closure__ tuple is corrupt. –  eryksun Jun 17 '14 at 18:57
    
Are you keeping a reference to my_callback after passing it to your lib? Otherwise the callback and thunk get deallocated, taking the references to inner and fn with them. The memory can still be partially intact, leading to weird errors when the lib finally calls the callback. –  eryksun Jun 17 '14 at 19:03
    
I will see if I can do something to ensure there's a reference to my_callback, but I think you're totally on the right track here. –  coleifer Jun 17 '14 at 19:46
    
If I create a list at module scope, then append inner to the list, it fixes the error. Thank you! I will now work on figuring out a slightly cleaner way of fixing this. –  coleifer Jun 17 '14 at 19:48

1 Answer 1

Thanks to eryksyn, I was able to fix this issue. The fix looks like:

def wrap_callback(fn):
    def inner(*args, **kwargs):
        return fn(*args, **kwargs)
    return _command_callback(inner), inner

def my_callback(*args):
    print args
    return 1

ctypes_cb, my_callback = wrap_callback(my_callback)
share|improve this answer
    
You must keep a reference to ctypes_cb, but you don't need another reference to inner. The CThunkObject in ctypes_cb._objects already references inner. –  eryksun Jun 17 '14 at 22:05

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