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I think this must be simple but I can't get it right...

I have an MxM triangular matrix, the coefficients of which are stored in a vector, row by row. For example:

M =   [ m00 m01 m02 m03 ] 
      [     m11 m12 m12 ]
      [         m22 m23 ]
      [             m33 ]

is stored as

coef[ m00 m01 m02 m03 m11 m12 m13 m22 m23 m33 ]

Now I'm looking for a non-recursive algorithm that gives me for matrix size M and coefficient array index i

unsigned int row_index(i,M)

and

unsigned int column_index(i,M)

of the matrix element that it refers to. So, row_index(9,4) == 3, column_index(7,4) == 2 etc. if the index counting is zero-based.

EDIT: Several replies using an iteration have been given. Does anyone know of algebraic expressions?

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Can you please rephrase that so that the elements in the array are maybe letters rather than numbers - it's hard to 100% understand exactly what your functions are supposed to be doing when you're using both zero-based row/col values and one-based values in the array itself. –  Alnitak Oct 28 '08 at 10:14
    
@Alnitak : done. –  andreas buykx Oct 28 '08 at 10:37
    
data[row * num_cols + column] is the classic expression for a C 2D array stored in memory as a single array. –  Paul Nathan Oct 28 '08 at 15:47
    
Obviously the repeated m12 in the matrix is an error. –  Richard A Oct 29 '08 at 3:25
1  
Yeah, the second one should be m13. I thought of mentioning it in my solution below, but didn't :-) –  ShreevatsaR Oct 30 '08 at 19:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's an algebraic (mostly) solution:

unsigned int row_index( unsigned int i, unsigned int M ){
    double m = M;
    double row = (-2*m - 1 + sqrt( (4*m*(m+1) - 8*(double)i - 7) )) / -2;
    if( row == (double)(int) row ) row -= 1;
    return (unsigned int) row;
}


unsigned int column_index( unsigned int i, unsigned int M ){
    unsigned int row = row_index( i, M);
    return  i - M * row + row*(row+1) / 2;
}

EDIT: fixed row_index()

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I don't think that works for every M. For example that solution gives row_index(12,5)=2, while the correct answer (if I did it correctly) is 3. –  mattiast Oct 28 '08 at 13:58
    
My observation as well. M=6 yields 3 erroneous values for row_index (and hence for column_index as well). –  andreas buykx Oct 28 '08 at 14:27
    
Yeah, that was way too easy. It works now. –  Matt Lewis Oct 28 '08 at 15:38
    
What are the magic numbers 2, 1, 4, 8 and 7? –  tommy.carstensen Jan 15 at 11:27

One-liners at the end of this reply, explanation follows :-)

The coefficient array has: M elements for the first row (row 0, in your indexing), (M-1) for the second (row 1), and so on, for a total of M+(M-1)+…+1=M(M+1)/2 elements.

It's slightly easier to work from the end, because the coefficient array always has 1 element for the last row (row M-1), 2 elements for the second-last row (row M-2), 3 elements for row M-3, and so on. The last K rows take up the last K(K+1)/2 positions of the coefficient array.

Now suppose you are given an index i in the coefficient array. There are M(M+1)/2-1-i elements at positions greater than i. Call this number i'; you want to find the largest k such that k(k+1)/2 ≤ i'. The form of this problem is the very source of your misery -- as far as I can see, you cannot avoid taking square roots :-)

Well let's do it anyway: k(k+1) ≤ 2i' means (k+1/2)2 - 1/4 ≤ 2i', or equivalently k ≤ (sqrt(8i'+1)-1)/2. Let me call the largest such k as K, then there are K rows that are later (out of a total of M rows), so the row_index(i,M) is M-1-K. As for the column index, K(K+1)/2 elements out of the i' are in later rows, so there are j'=i'-K(K+1)/2 later elements in this row (which has K+1 elements in total), so the column index is K-j'. [Or equivalently, this row starts at (K+1)(K+2)/2 from the end, so we just need to subtract the starting position of this row from i: i-[M(M+1)/2-(K+1)(K+2)/2]. It is heartening that both expressions give the same answer!]

(Pseudo-)Code [using ii instead of i' as some languages don't allow variables with names like i' ;-)]:

row_index(i, M):
    ii = M(M+1)/2-1-i
    K = floor((sqrt(8ii+1)-1)/2)
    return M-1-K

column_index(i, M):
    ii = M(M+1)/2-1-i
    K = floor((sqrt(8ii+1)-1)/2)
    return i - M(M+1)/2 + (K+1)(K+2)/2

Of course you can turn them into one-liners by substituting the expressions for ii and K. You may have to be careful about precision errors, but there are ways of finding the integer square root which do not require floating-point computation. Also, to quote Knuth: "Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not tried it."

If I may venture to make a further remark: simply keeping all the values in an M×M array will take at most twice the memory, and depending on your problem, the factor of 2 might be insignificant compared to algorithmic improvements, and might be worth trading the possibly expensive computation of the square root for the simpler expressions you'll have.

[Edit: BTW, you can prove that floor((sqrt(8ii+1)-1)/2) = (isqrt(8ii+1)-1)/2 where isqrt(x)=floor(sqrt(x)) is integer square root, and the division is integer division (truncation; the default in C/C++/Java etc.) -- so if you're worried about precision issues you only need to worry about implementing a correct integer square root.]

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This is exactly what I needed to find! In my case, I'm trying to perform calculations on every pair of elements between two vectors on a GPU so the row and column are element indices. In that case, its about more than just doubling the memory footprint, although that's a big part of the problem as well. There's some tweaking I need to do to deal with memory addressing, but your explanation gives a great framework. Thanks! –  Omegaman May 27 at 23:30

It has to be that

i == col + row*(M-1)-row*(row-1)/2

So one way to find col and row is to iterate over possible values of row:

for(row = 0; row < M; row++){
  col = i - row*(M-1)-row*(row-1)/2
  if (row <= col < M) return (row,column);
}

This is at least non-recursive, I don't know if you can do this without iteration.

As can be seen from this and other answers, you pretty much have to calculate row in order to calculate column, so it could be smart to do both in one function.

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There may be a clever one liner for these, but (minus any error checking):

unsigned int row_index( unsigned int i, unsigned int M ){
    unsigned int row = 0;
    unsigned int delta = M - 1;
    for( unsigned int x = delta; x < i; x += delta-- ){
        row++;
    }
    return row;
}

unsigned int column_index( unsigned int i, unsigned int M ){
    unsigned int row = 0;
    unsigned int delta = M - 1;
    unsigned int x;
    for( x = delta; x < i; x += delta-- ){
        row++;
    }
    return M + i - x - 1;
}
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The row index is OK, the column index has an offset of 2. Could you change the return statement in return M + i - x - i;? thanks. –  andreas buykx Oct 28 '08 at 12:00
    
Whoops. Fixed it. –  Matt Lewis Oct 28 '08 at 12:28

Took me some time to understand what you needed! :)

unsigned int row_index(int i, int m)
{
    int iCurrentRow = 0;
    int iTotalItems = 0;
    for(int j = m; j > 0; j--)
    {
    	iTotalItems += j;

    	if( (i+1) <= iTotalItems)
    		return iCurrentRow;

    	iCurrentRow ++;
    }

    return -1; // Not checking if "i" can be in a MxM matrix.
}

Sorry forgot the other function.....

unsigned int column_index(int i, int m)
{
    int iTotalItems = 0;
    for(int j = m; j > 0; j--)
    {
    	iTotalItems += j;

    	if( (i+1) <= iTotalItems)
    		return m - (iTotalItems - i);
    }

    return -1; // Not checking if "i" can be in a MxM matrix.
}
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I thought a little bit and I got the following result. Note that you get both row and columns on one shot.

Assumptions: Rows start a 0. Columns start at 0. Index start at 0

Notation

N = matrix size (was M in the original problem)

m = Index of the element

The psuedo code is

function ind2subTriu(m,N)
{
  d = 0;
  i = -1;
  while d < m
  {
    i = i + 1
    d = i*(N-1) - i*(i-1)/2
  }
  i0 = i-1;
  j0 = m - i0*(N-1) + i0*(i0-1)/2 + i0 + 1;
  return i0,j0
}

And some octave/matlab code

function [i0 j0]= ind2subTriu(m,N)
 I = 0:N-2;
 d = I*(N-1)-I.*(I-1)/2;
 i0 = I(find (d < m,1,'last'));
 j0 = m - d(i0+1) + i0 + 1;

What do you think?

As of December 2011 really good code to do this was added to GNU/Octave. Potentially they will extend sub2ind and ind2sub. The code can be found for the moment as private functions ind2sub_tril and sub2ind_tril

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JuanPi: You seem to have an old, unregistered account, and a newer registered account. I've flagged the post to get a mod's attention, but you should post on meta asking for an account merge. –  bdonlan Jul 7 '11 at 22:59
    
@JuanPi - Flag this question and indicate both of your accounts, we'll be happy to get it straightened out. –  Tim Post Jul 8 '11 at 2:07

The explanation of ShreevatsaR is excellent and helped me solve my problem. However, the explanation and code provided for the column index give a slightly different answer than what the question asks for.

To reiterate, there are j' = i' - K(K+1)/2 elements in the row after i. But the row, like every other row, has M elements. Hence the (zero-based) column index is y = M - 1 - j'.

The corresponding pseudo code is:

column_index(i, M):
  ii = M(M+1)/2-1-i
  K = floor((sqrt(8ii+1)-1)/2)
  jj = ii - K(K+1)/2
  return M-1-jj

The answer given by ShreevatsaR, K - j', is the column index when starting to count (with zero) from the diagonal of the matrix. Hence, his calculation gives column_index(7,4) = 0 and not, as specified in the question, column_index(7,4) = 2.

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