Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
SELECT * FROM `TABLE` WHERE
(`PRIMARY_KEY`= `VALUE1`) OR
(`PRIMARY_KEY`= `VALUE2`) OR
(`PRIMARY_KEY`= `VALUE3`) OR
(`PRIMARY_KEY`= `VALUE4`) OR
(`PRIMARY_KEY`= `VALUE5`) OR ...

This works. But is there a faster way?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT * FROM table WHERE primary_key IN (value1, value2, ...)
share|improve this answer

Using the value in (list) construct is not faster, but the SQL-code will be much easier to read/understand once someone needs to maintain the code.

SELECT * 
FROM `TABLE` 
WHERE `PRIMARY_KEY` in( `VALUE1`
                       , `VALUE2`
                       , `VALUE3`
                       , `VALUE4`
                       , `VALUE5`
                      ) 

Updated: Rewritten to reflect the feedback from the comments.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it's a common fallacy that in() is faster that chained OR statements (or vice-versa). It's just simply less typing. I tried to find some references to this, but getting a useful Google result where "in" and "or" are vital keywords is difficult =P –  Peter Bailey Mar 11 '10 at 17:55
    
@Peter Bailey: You are probably right if/when we are talking about DB performance, and I was debating with myself if I should should use "will or might in the answer above ... , BUT consider programmer and DBA performance (in head scratching hours) when maintaining / optimizing that code .. On the other hand, it will be much easier for the optimizer (human or MySQL) to relize that an index should be used (moot in this case, PRIMARY_KEY is PK) –  lexu Mar 11 '10 at 18:30
    
@Peter Bailey: That was my first thought when I read the answers too, so I tried it with Oracle 10g, and execution plan is the same. I assume that other DBs are going to handle it the same way. @lexu: It is certainly easier for humans to read, and I would always do it that way. Non-human optimizers should be fine with both ways, though :) –  Peter Lang Mar 11 '10 at 18:37
    
@Peter Bailey & @Peter Lang: rewrote my answer, thx for the feedback! –  lexu Mar 11 '10 at 18:46

what about

SELECT * FROM `TABLE` WHERE
(`PRIMARY_KEY`IN( `VALUE1`,`VALUE2`,`VALUE3`,`VALUE4`,`VALUE5`) )
share|improve this answer

You can use the IN keyword to achieve this:

SELECT * FROM Table WHERE PRIMARY_KEY IN (VALUE1, VALUE2, ...)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.