Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know this is really simple, and it's probably already been answered somewhere, but I'm having lots of trouble finding it anywhere, probably because I'm searching for the wrong term.

I have something like this (but far more complicated):

score = {}
z = 4
while z > 0:
    score[z] = random.randrange(1,12)
    z -= 1

So eventually I arrive at these values:

score[1] = 7
score[2] = 9
score[3] = 12
score[4] = 7

I want something to set a variable to 3, because score[3] is the largest.

score[1] = 9
score[2] = 9
score[3] = 7
score[4] = 8

And in this instance, it should set the variable to 0 or something, because the highest number is a tie.

share|improve this question
    
Are you intending score to be a dictionary ("{}") or a List ("[]")? –  CptSupermrkt Jun 17 at 23:00
    
@CptSupermrkt that assignment would not work from an empty list and the OP never mentions lists. –  jonrsharpe Jun 17 at 23:01
    
I know, that's why I'm trying to figure out what he's trying to do because there are contradictions in his question. –  CptSupermrkt Jun 17 at 23:02
    
I believe I want score to be a dictionary, because I'm modifying it elsewhere with while loops, changing the key. –  user3750369 Jun 17 at 23:04
    
@CptSupermrkt what contradictions? They said "key", used dictionary syntax, ... –  jonrsharpe Jun 17 at 23:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use collections.Counter

from collections import Counter

score=Counter()
score[1] = 7
score[2] = 9
score[3] = 12
score[4] = 7
print score
Counter({3: 12, 2: 9, 1: 7, 4: 7})
print score.most_common()[0][1],score.most_common()[1][1]
12 9

If score.most_common()[0][1] == score.most_common()[1][1] there are two equal max values so set variable to 0

else set variable to score.most_common()[0][0] which is the key of the highest value

score=Counter()
score[1] = 9
score[2] = 9
score[3] = 7
score[4] = 8
print score
print score.most_common()[0][1],score.most_common()[1][1]
print score.most_common()[0][1]==score.most_common()[1][1]
Counter({1: 9, 2: 9, 4: 8, 3: 7})
9 9
True
share|improve this answer
    
Reread the question more carefully and realized this one gets closest to what the author intended. Excellent use of Counter! –  Huu Nguyen Jun 17 at 23:30
1  
Thanks, yes the only values that matter are the first two highest so most_common comes in handy. –  Padraic Cunningham Jun 17 at 23:36
    
This is a totally non-intuitive use of Counter. You're lucky that the values were integers! –  Mark Ransom Jun 18 at 0:48
max_score = max(score.values())
keys = [k for k in score if score[k] == max_score]

This produces a list of the keys that have the highest score, whether that's one or more.

share|improve this answer
    
This is technically correct (and very elegant, mind you) but don't you think it's a bit silly that OP is working with a dictionary to begin with? Are we supposed to infer that his keys will be something other than fancy list indexes? –  Adam Smith Jun 17 at 23:19
    
@AdamSmith I don't judge, I just assume the OP has their reasons. Maybe that's naive of me in this case since the example uses incrementing integers. –  Mark Ransom Jun 17 at 23:21
    
I normally don't either when the OP's code makes sense, however in this case I'm given to believe he's a novice programmer that could use a bit more direction. Your answer, although correct, provides little of that. You've still earned my +1, however, for tackling the problem in the most straightforward way. –  Adam Smith Jun 17 at 23:23

If you must use a dictionary for score, then you can use the functional form:

def index_of_highest_score(scores):
    max_score = max(scores.values())
    keys = []
    for key, value in scores.iteritems():
        if value == max_score:
            keys.append(key)
    if len(keys) > 1:
        return 0
    else:
        return keys[0]

score = {}
score[1] = 7
score[2] = 9
score[3] = 12
score[4] = 7
print index_of_highest_score(score) # Prints 3

score[1] = 9
score[2] = 9
score[3] = 7
score[4] = 8
print index_of_highest_score(score) # Prints 0
share|improve this answer
    
Dictionaries don't have indices. –  jonrsharpe Jun 17 at 23:00
1  
Not sure why this was down-voted. Using a list and its .index method is the most Pythonic solution here. –  Dan Lenski Jun 17 at 23:06
    
I assumed score was a list at first. Saw your comment then checked the question and hit the panic button. Thanks for the heads up! I've edited my answer to deal with both cases. –  Huu Nguyen Jun 17 at 23:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.