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The purpose of the code is to perform the evaluation of binary expression trees (i.e. the one below).

I am confused about how does if (root.getLeft() == null || root.getRight() == null) check the missing operands? If it is a leaf node (operand), will it cause an exception, as the if condition will be true? I also commented by questions in the code. Many thanks in advance!

        (+)
     (*)      (2)
  (+)    (-)
 3  4    5   2

public float calculateValue(TreeNode root) {
  // Check that the root value is not null
  if (root == null) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("Root Node must have a value");
  }
 //If this is a leaf node, it should be a number, so return this
  if (root.getLeft() == null && root.getRight() == null){
     try {
          return Float.parseFloat(root.getItem().toString()); 
     catch (NumberFormatException parseError){
          throw new NumberFormatException("Leaves must be numeric");
     }
   }
// Validate that we have operands
 if (root.getLeft() == null || root.getRight() == null) {     
//how does it check the missing operands? ? If it is a leaf node (operand), will it cause an exception, as the if condition is true? 
     throw new IllegalArgumentException("Operator missing operands”);
  }
// Retrieve the operands
 float leftOperand = calculateValue(root.getLeft());
 float rightOperand = calculateValue(root.getRight());
// Extract the operator
 String operatorString = root.getItem().toString();
 if (operatorString.length() > 1)
 {
     throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid operation!");
 }
 char operator = operatorString.charAt(0);
// Evaluate the operation
....
share|improve this question
    
"how does it check the missing operands? ? If it is a leaf node (operand), will it cause an exception, as the if condition is true?" Um...yes? Assuming leaf nodes have no left or right siblings, presumably getLeft and getRight return null. And so the code will throw an exception. What is it doing that you don't expect? – T.J. Crowder Jun 17 '14 at 23:47
    
If it is a leaf node, it's supposed to continue executing. If only one leaf node is an operand, it's supposed to throw an exception as we need two lead nodes as operands. I guess? I am rather confused about how it works here...apologize if I haven't explained it very clearly. – user3735871 Jun 17 '14 at 23:58
1  
@ user: "If only one leaf node is an operand, it's supposed to throw an exception as we need two lead nodes as operands." That's what the code does, because it uses || ("OR"). So if (root.getLeft() == null || root.getRight() == null) means "If root.getLeft() == null OR root.getRight() == null` then do the bit in the block (which throws the exception). – T.J. Crowder Jun 18 '14 at 0:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Below I've got your code up to that if-statement with the comments removed:

if (root == null) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Root Node must have a value");
}

if (root.getLeft() == null && root.getRight() == null) {
    try {
       return Float.parseFloat(root.getItem().toString()); 
    } catch (NumberFormatException parseError) {
       throw new NumberFormatException("Leaves must be numeric");
    }
}

if (root.getLeft() == null || root.getRight() == null) {     
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Operator missing operands");
}

To answer your question, note that in the case of a leaf node, the second if-statement is true. Thus, it will go through that try-catch and never even execute if (root.getLeft() == null || root.getRight() == null).

share|improve this answer
    
because there is a return in the try block? Thanks for that! – user3735871 Jun 18 '14 at 0:00
    
@user3735871 Now answering your remark, yes, the idea is that once it gets to the try-catch, you'll either do the return Float.parseFloat... without problems or throw an Exception, but either way you will not go to the third if-statement. – Dennis Meng Jun 18 '14 at 0:04

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