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Let's say I have a DataFrame that looks like:

In [41]: df.columns
Out[41]: Index([u'Date Time', u'Open', u'High', u'Low', u'Last'], dtype='object')

In [42]: df
Out[42]: 
              Date Time     Open     High      Low     Last
0   12/02/2007 23:23:00  1443.75  1444.00  1443.75  1444.00
1   12/02/2007 23:25:00  1444.00  1444.00  1444.00  1444.00
2   12/02/2007 23:26:00  1444.25  1444.25  1444.25  1444.25
3   12/02/2007 23:27:00  1444.25  1444.25  1444.25  1444.25
4   12/02/2007 23:28:00  1444.25  1444.25  1444.25  1444.25
5   12/02/2007 23:29:00  1444.25  1444.25  1444.00  1444.00
6   12/02/2007 23:30:00  1444.25  1444.25  1444.00  1444.00
7   12/02/2007 23:31:00  1444.25  1444.25  1443.75  1444.00
8   12/02/2007 23:32:00  1444.00  1444.00  1443.75  1443.75
9   12/02/2007 23:33:00  1444.00  1444.00  1443.50  1443.50

I would like to create a an array that associates the 'Date Time' column of the current index with the remaining columns of this and the previous n indices. For example, the target result when index = 9 and n = 2 would transform these rows:

7   12/02/2007 23:31:00  1444.25  1444.25  1443.75  1444.00
8   12/02/2007 23:32:00  1444.00  1444.00  1443.75  1443.75
9   12/02/2007 23:33:00  1444.00  1444.00  1443.50  1443.50

Into a list with with the following values where indices 1-4 came from row 9, 5-8 from row 8, and 9-12 from row 7:

['12/02/2007 23:33:00', 1444.00, 1444.00, 1443.50, 1443.50, 1444.00, 1444.00, 1443.75, 1443.75, 1444.25, 1444.25, 1443.75, 1444.00]

I'm sure that I can easily iterate over slices of the dataframe and create the array, but I was hoping that there was a more efficient way of doing this.

EDIT:

Here is some code that generates the result I am looking for. A couple of responses indicate that I might look at the rolling_apply or rolling_window functions, but I was not able to figure out how that might work.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

data = pd.DataFrame([
    ['12/02/2007 23:23:00', 1443.75,  1444.00, 1443.75, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:25:00', 1444.00,  1444.00, 1444.00, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:26:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.25, 1444.25],
    ['12/02/2007 23:27:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.25, 1444.25],
    ['12/02/2007 23:28:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.25, 1444.25],
    ['12/02/2007 23:29:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.00, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:30:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.00, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:31:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1443.75, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:32:00', 1444.00,  1444.00, 1443.75, 1443.75],
    ['12/02/2007 23:33:00', 1444.00,  1444.00, 1443.50, 1443.50]
])

window_size = 6

# Prime the DataFrame using the date as the index
result = pd.DataFrame(
    [data.iloc[0:window_size, 1:].values.flatten()],
    [data.iloc[window_size - 1, 0]])

for t in data.iloc[window_size:, 1:].itertuples(index=True):
    # drop the oldest values and append the new ones
    new_features = result.tail(1).iloc[:, 4:].values.flatten()
    new_features = np.append(new_features, list(t[1:]), 0)
    # turn it into a DataFrame and append it to the ongoing result
    new_df = pd.DataFrame([new_features], [t[0]])
    result = result.append(new_df)

This method is not very fast, so I'm still interested in ways to improve it.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want this? What are you trying to do? (This seems like an example of an XY problem) –  Andy Hayden Jun 18 at 5:10
1  
You're looking for "windowing functions", possible just rolling_window. –  U2EF1 Jun 18 at 6:04
    
I'm taking a pre-formatted datafile as input. The file has the same structure as the pandas dataframe with the exception of the index. I would like to build a feature set for an ML algorithm that encompasses each of the real number values for N rows as features from that data. I would like to generate a feature set for every row > N to produce a moving window over the data. –  jxstanford Jun 18 at 6:06

2 Answers 2

This simple function worked for me

import itertools
def collapse(df, index_loc, number):
    return list(itertools.chain(*[list(df.loc[x].values) for x in xrange(index_loc - number, index_loc + 1)]))

Where df is your data frame, index_loc the start index (assumes integer index as you have in the example), number is your 'n'. Just takes the value of the data frame at each index point by using the values method, and then chains the lists together....

share|improve this answer
    
since reading the comments above, I think you are doing something more complex. Perhaps this is not helpful –  Woody Pride Jun 18 at 8:33
    
You lose a lot of the efficiency by leaving numpy/pandas, if you were to use a rolling function you don't need to create anything - it'll be entirely view-based. Not a fan of this mixture of numpy and itertools here... :s –  Andy Hayden Jun 18 at 20:27
    
agreed, the user seemed to want a list, at first glance, but I think perhaps this output is not what was needed to solve whatever the problem was. –  Woody Pride Jun 19 at 3:54
    
I appreciate the suggestion. I would like to keep it in pandas/numpy if at all possible. I looked at the rolling window options. I might have missed something, but they seem to want to roll up to a single value, not a row. I'll look into it more... –  jxstanford Jun 22 at 19:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is some code that generates the result I am looking for. A couple of responses indicate that I might look at the rolling_apply or rolling_window functions, but I was not able to figure out how that might work.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

data = pd.DataFrame([
    ['12/02/2007 23:23:00', 1443.75,  1444.00, 1443.75, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:25:00', 1444.00,  1444.00, 1444.00, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:26:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.25, 1444.25],
    ['12/02/2007 23:27:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.25, 1444.25],
    ['12/02/2007 23:28:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.25, 1444.25],
    ['12/02/2007 23:29:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.00, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:30:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1444.00, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:31:00', 1444.25,  1444.25, 1443.75, 1444.00],
    ['12/02/2007 23:32:00', 1444.00,  1444.00, 1443.75, 1443.75],
    ['12/02/2007 23:33:00', 1444.00,  1444.00, 1443.50, 1443.50]
])

window_size = 6

# Prime the DataFrame using the date as the index
result = pd.DataFrame(
    [data.iloc[0:window_size, 1:].values.flatten()],
    [data.iloc[window_size - 1, 0]])

for t in data.iloc[window_size:, 1:].itertuples(index=True):
    # drop the oldest values and append the new ones
    new_features = result.tail(1).iloc[:, 4:].values.flatten()
    new_features = np.append(new_features, list(t[1:]), 0)
    # turn it into a DataFrame and append it to the ongoing result
    new_df = pd.DataFrame([new_features], [t[0]])
    result = result.append(new_df)

This may not be extremely efficient, but it solves the problem.

share|improve this answer

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