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I am trying to create a function that I can pass other functions, which will catch any errors, but otherwise simply return the return value of the function. Here's what I've tried:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int fun(int input)
{
    return input;
}

template <typename F, typename...Args>
static auto HandledCall(const F& function, Args...args)
-> decltype(function(...args))
{
    try
    {
        return function(...args);
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        return NULL;
    }
}

int main() {
    std::cout << HandledCall(fun,1) << std::endl; // this should return 1
    std::cout << HandledCall(fun,-1) << std::endl; // this should return 0      
    return 0;
}

I hope the intention is relatively clear; I want HandledCall to be able to receive any kind of function, and return its return value (as long as NULL is implicitly castable to this value in the case of an error). However, when I try to compile the above code I get these kinds of errors;

prog.cpp:10:78: error: expected primary-expression before ‘...’ token static auto HandledCall(const F& function, Args...args) -> decltype(function(...args))

Clearly I'm not doing this variadic templates thing correctly... Any suggestions?

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... alone is not enough, you need to give the parameter a name and use that name with the currently lonely .... –  Captain Obvlious Jun 18 at 4:10
    
@CaptainObvlious I've made an attempt at this and updated the question, but I'm still getting errors.. –  Arman Jun 18 at 4:13
1  
That's because ...args should be args... –  Captain Obvlious Jun 18 at 4:25
1  
What's the logic behind having such a function? It automatically catches all exceptions and then ignores them. The point of throwing an exception is not to be ignored. While in certain circumstances, ignoring an exception is just the right thing to do, it is not good in general and a general templated function-call wrapper calls for abuse. Moreover, you should rather name if CallAndIgnoreExceptions(). –  Walter Jun 18 at 8:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Something like this?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int fun(int input)
{
    return input;
}

template <typename T> struct ReturnType;

template<class Ret, class... Args>
struct ReturnType<Ret(Args...)> 
{
   typedef Ret type;
};


template <typename F, typename...Args>
static auto HandledCall(const F& function, Args...args) -> typename ReturnType<F>::type
{
    try
    {
        return function(args...);
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        return typename ReturnType<F>::type{0};
    }
}

int main() {
    std::cout << HandledCall(fun,1) << std::endl; // this should return 1
    std::cout << HandledCall(fun,-1) << std::endl; // this should return 0      
    return 0;
}

Update

An improved version of HandledCall (Thanks to Mankarse):

template <typename F, typename...Args>
static auto HandledCall(const F& function, Args&&...args) -> typename ReturnType<F>::type
{
    try
    {
        return function(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        return typename ReturnType<F>::type{0};
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ideally, you would write it as /*...*/HandledCall(F &&function, Args... &&args) /*...*/ return std::forward<F>(function)(std::forward<Args>(args)...); /*...*/, in order to perfectly forward the arguments from the call site. –  Mankarse Jun 18 at 4:29
    
@Mankarse. Thanks for the suggestion. I added an update. –  R Sahu Jun 18 at 4:33
    
@RSahu What's the point of std::forward? They're not r-values... –  Arman Jun 18 at 4:53
    
Should have been HandledCall(const F& function, Args&&...args) –  BЈовић Jun 18 at 4:55
    
@BЈовић That seems right to me. I updated the answer. I am on uncertain ground here. I need to shore up my understanding of perfect forwarding. –  R Sahu Jun 18 at 5:00

The return type of the function call can be determined using std::result_of.

template<typename F, typename... Args>
typename std::result_of<F(Args...)>::type
    HandledCall(F&& func, Args&&... args)
{
    using result_type = typename std::result_of<F(Args...)>::type;
    try {
        return std::forward<F>(func)(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    } catch(...) {
        return result_type();
    }
}

Live demo

share|improve this answer
    
I thought something like std::result_of might be available but didn't know exactly what to look for. Thanks for the pointer :) –  R Sahu Jun 18 at 5:27
    
You may want to modify this to handle cases where F has a void return type. Preferably by finding an even cleaner way to solve the problem than the one in my answer (which shamelessly plagiarizes yours). ;) –  Agentlien Jun 18 at 8:33
1  
@Agentlien Take a look at the "Live demo" link, it does handle void. –  Praetorian Jun 18 at 12:35
    
Really? If I try HandledCall(bar) it gives me an error. coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/42ebd7a0785d580b –  Agentlien Jun 18 at 14:46
1  
@Agentlien Hah! I only tested it within the decltype expression, which is unevaluated, so it didn't trigger that error. Fixed now. Thanks for catching that. –  Praetorian Jun 18 at 15:01

Here is a version based on the solution presented by @Praetorian but which also works for functions with a void return type. The reason the other answers could not handle this case is the explicit instantiation of an object of type void.

template<typename T> 
T default_value(){return {};}

template<>
void default_value<void>(){}

template<typename F, typename... Args>
typename std::result_of<F(Args...)>::type
  HandledCall(F&& func, Args&&... args)
{
  try {
      return std::forward<F>(func)(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
  } catch(...) {
      return default_value<typename std::result_of<F(Args...)>::type>();
  }
}

The reason this works is because the standard allows explicitly returning void values in a function with void return type.

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