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for instance we have following data

X =

   10.5720    3.1049   11.3570
    9.9006    5.3971   10.8304
   13.8345   13.6953    7.9372
   10.7696   11.1401   10.4185
    3.7841   11.7044    5.4435
   13.1218    6.5599   10.6859
   12.2868   11.9733    6.5255
   12.2178    6.7505    3.1736
   10.4777    8.1317    9.7029
   15.0439   10.4151   10.2047
    9.0041    5.2511    8.2246
   15.2333    5.4717    8.4375
   12.8940    8.9781   12.1112
   12.3304    8.3102    8.6972
   14.9862    7.2163    3.7159
    6.1892   10.2348    7.8736
   17.1267    5.9513   10.3071
   10.6885   10.8199    7.1708
    8.3460   10.9480    9.1208
   10.3991    5.0058   13.7913
   15.3103   14.7297    7.3875
   19.0889    7.6657    6.8140
   10.4589    8.6138    7.8456
   13.9647    6.2520   10.6031
    8.4215    7.0871   11.0461
   12.9584    7.6198    0.8400
   16.2182    3.9430   12.3646
   12.4796   10.8249    6.5618
   14.7202   13.7099    6.9863
   13.9110   10.8402   11.7954

I have calculated covariance matrix, eigenvalue/eigenvectors and principal components

>> Covariance=cov(X);
>> [V,D]=eig(Covariance);
>> principal=X*V;

how can I recover X from this equation? Is this equation correct?

>> X1=principal*V';

I am getting same result, just want to make sure that it is correct for all data.

One more question please, if instead of directly using matlab's function, I will do it like this:

>> mean1=mean(X);
>> centered=X-repmat(mean1,30,1);
>> covariance1=(centered'*centered)/29;

how can I recover original matrix?

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1  
It doesn't look like your question is about programming, but rather about understanding the mathematics behind it. Therefore, to me this looks like it's off-topic. –  Stewie Griffin Jun 18 '14 at 8:49
    
Principal components are not just X*V. You'll have to reduce the number of columns in V (discard) to reduce dimensions. No, you can never recover your data exactly. What you get back is a "de-noised" estimate –  Adarsh Chavakula Jun 18 '14 at 14:54
2  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about a mathematical problem rather than a programming issue. It is possible best addressed to one of the mathematics related sites in the network. –  Bart Jul 2 '14 at 20:10

1 Answer 1

You can get the approximated values not the exact values.

if U is the eigenvector calculated from the covariance matrix of the data. Then the reduced data would be:

Z = X' . U

PCA reduces the dimension of the data by introducing new dimensions and combining data from other dimensions into the new one. So, the main data would be projected on the new dimensions. Considering the result is Z then if you do something like:

X2 = U' . Z

to inverse the formula and get the data back, You will get some approximated values of your data. and X is not equal to X2

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not approximation,let us assume that are are not reducing,it simple would be X*V'; –  dato datuashvili Jun 18 '14 at 10:02
    
It is the same, you wrote it in matlab way though. The PCA reduces the dimensionality by projecting the data. There is no way to get back the original data. –  NKN Jun 18 '14 at 10:19

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