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Given the code below, how would you create/implement SR.h so that it produces the correct output WITHOUT any asterisks in your solution?

I got bummed by this question. I would like to know some of the different approaches that people use for this problem.

#include <cstdio>
#include "SR.h"

int main()
{
    int j = 5;
    int a[] = {10, 15};
    {
        SR x(j), y(a[0]), z(a[1]);

        j = a[0];
        a[0] = a[1];
        a[1] = j;

        printf("j = %d, a = {%d, %d}\n", j, a[0], a[1]);
    }

    printf("j = %d, a = {%d, %d}\n", j, a[0], a[1]);
}

Output:

j = 10, a = {15, 10}
j = 5, a = {10, 15}

Second one:

#include <cstdio>
#include "SR.h"
int main()
{
    int sum = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i < 100; i++) {
        SR ii(i);
        while (i--)
            sum += i;
    }
    printf("sum = %d\n", sum);
}

//The output is "sum = 161700".
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10  
Why shouldn't this be a real question? Am I missing something? –  sbi Mar 11 '10 at 20:27
3  
@sbi Interview questions, particularly artificial ones, usually are not "real". Not that I downvoted or close voted this one myself. –  anon Mar 11 '10 at 20:29
7  
This is indeed an EXCELLENT question, both for general knowledge and interview purposes. –  Matthieu N. Mar 11 '10 at 21:38
2  
@Kirill et al.: Given that three separate people came up with the correct answer within about twenty minutes of the question being posted, I'm confident that it could "be reasonably answered in its current form" :P . –  Bill Mar 11 '10 at 22:15
3  
@Neil: Call me conservative, but to me a question seems "real" when it comes in the form of a grammatical question (i.e., something you can put a question mark after), poses a problem, and, in theory, allows allows you to write up something which answers it. Whether it is "artificial" (whatever that means - wouldn't almost all homework questions be artificial?) seems subjective to me, the criteria I gave seems objective. –  sbi Mar 12 '10 at 6:14
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5 Answers 5

up vote 64 down vote accepted

SR is acting as a captured-variable-restorer. When it goes out of scope it restores some value that it previously captured.

The constructor will do two things: capture a reference, and capture the value of that reference. The destructor will restore the original value to that reference.

class SR
{
public:
  SR(int& var) : capture(var), value(var) {}
  ~SR() { capture = value; }

private:
  int& capture;
  int value;
};

Edit: Just a guess, but I assume SR is supposed to stand for ScopeRestorer?

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8  
My thought was SR = SaveRestore. –  Mark Ransom Mar 11 '10 at 21:26
1  
@Mark: SaveRestore seems a lot more likely, thanks! –  Bill Mar 11 '10 at 22:17
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I don't have time to write code but, you need to use references &int in constructor. And you would need to restore original values to references in the destructor. When SR goes out of scope it needs to restore original values that were passed in during construction.

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+1 Cool and Crisp! –  bragboy Mar 11 '10 at 20:31
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For the first one:

class SR
{
    int &ref;
    int orig;
public:
    SR(int& r)
    :ref(r), orig(r)
    {
    }

    ~SR()
    {
        ref = orig;
    } 
};

For the second snippet, should it be the same SR or some other SR?

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This solution works for both, so I assume it's meant to satisfy both main functions. –  Bill Mar 11 '10 at 20:52
    
yes...it's meant for both –  aherlambang Mar 11 '10 at 21:04
3  
Your code wont compile until you place a colon after public –  Matthieu N. Mar 11 '10 at 21:31
    
Sorry, typo. Fixed. –  Seva Alekseyev Mar 11 '10 at 22:06
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#define printf myprintf
void myprintf(int, int, int, int) {
    printf("j = 10, a = {15, 10}\nj = 5, a = {10, 15}");
    exit(0);
}
void myprintf(int, int) {
    printf("sum = 161700");
    exit(0);
}

Or, in other words, I think the concept of the scope restorer macro is really cool, but I don't like the way the question was worded :)

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haha, funny! This could actually be a smart ass answer for this problem. –  Grim May 31 '11 at 9:50
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A solution to #2 is:

#define _SR_H_

int count = 0;

class SR {
private:
    int& ref;
public:
    SR(int& val) : ref(val) {
        count++;
    }
    ~SR() {
        if (count == (161700 + 1)) {
            ref = 100;
        } else {
            ref = 1;
        }
    }
};

#endif

I know this solution is a bit ugly, and it runs the for loop 161700 times to add the numbers. This would work for any number, but I am not sure why 161700 was chosen. It doesn't factorize nicely either.

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