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I have a CGI script that prints the following on stdout:

print "Status: 302 Redirect\n";
print "Server: Apache-Coyote/1.1\n";
print "Location: $redirect\n";
print "Content-Length: 0\n";
print "Date: $date\n\n";

Where $redirect and $date are reasonable values. What Apache2 actually sends also includes a Content-Type: header (text/plain). I've commented out the DefaultType in the server configuration file.

I'm trying to debug a downstream problem that arises when no Content-Type: header is sent. So what magic incantation do I have to perform to prevent Apache2 from adding the content type header?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

According to my (admittedly brief) reading of server/protocol.c and server/core.c, you cannot.

It always defaults to DefaultType (text/plain by default) if that header is not present.

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Ah. Grumble. I guess I'll have to setup some other web server in order to debug my client. (I'm trying to fix a bug report that says my code falls over if the server doesn't send a Content-Type at all.) – Norm Mar 19 '10 at 14:36
2  
Will the CGI run on the command-line? Just run the above script out of inetd perhaps? – ceri Mar 19 '10 at 14:43
    
Netcat is your friend. Have it listen on a port and push back the content you want from a file. No need to run it in inetd. – Jan Hertsens Aug 10 '15 at 22:59

RemoveType will stop sending a content type with the resource.

Addendum

<Files defaulttypenone.txt>
DefaultType None 
</Files>
<Files removetype.txt>
RemoveType .txt
</Files>
<Files forcetype.txt>
ForceType None
</Files>

Tested on my own server, these three solutions and none worked. They all returned text/plain.

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<Files defaulttypenone.txt> DefaultType None </Files> <Files removetype.txt> RemoveType .txt </Files> <Files forcetype.txt> ForceType None </Files> Tested on my own server, this three solutions and none worked. They all returned text/plain. – karlcow Mar 19 '10 at 22:13

If all you are trying to do is prep a very specific test case server-side, you can always "cheat" by pre-baking output in a text file and having netcat listen for connections on some port.

I use that trick when I want to be 100% sure of each byte that the server sends.

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You can try with the directive:

ResponseHeader unset Content-Type
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No, although I can use header add to add new header (so I know header processing is being performed), header unset content-type has no effect. – Norm Mar 13 '10 at 13:41

As I read the Apache docs in question, what you want may actually be

Header unset Content-Type

Hope this does it!

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1  
No, that didn't work. I think ResponseHeader became Header in Apache2. – Norm Mar 19 '10 at 14:35

Even if we delete the Content-Type header from the request via the "Header unset Content-Type" directive, apache regenerates the Content-Type header from another field of the request structure. Therefore, we first force that other field to a reserved value, in order to prevent the header regeneration, then we remove the Content-Type via the "Header unset" directive.

For apache2.2:

Header set Content-Type none
Header unset Content-Type

For apache2.4:

Header set Content-Type ""
Header unset Content-Type
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