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Suppose we have the following function template:

template <typename Functor, typename... Arguments>
void IterateThrough(Functor functor, Arguments&&... arguments)
{
    // apply functor to all arguments
}

This function is usually implemented as follows:

template <typename Functor, typename... Arguments>
void IterateThrough1(Functor functor, Arguments&&... arguments)
{
    int iterate[]{0, (functor(std::forward<Arguments>(arguments)), void(), 0)...};
    static_cast<void>(iterate);
}

Another way:

struct Iterate
{
    template <typename... Arguments>
    Iterate(Arguments&&... arguments)
    {
    }
};

template <typename Functor, typename... Arguments>
void IterateThrough2(Functor functor, Arguments&&... arguments)
{
    Iterate{(functor(std::forward<Arguments>(arguments)), void(), 0)...};
}

I have found yet another approach which uses a variadic lambda:

template <typename Functor, typename... Arguments>
void IterateThrough3(Functor functor, Arguments&&... arguments)
{
    [](...){}((functor(std::forward<Arguments>(arguments)), void(), 0)...);
}

What pros and cons has this method in comparison with first two?

share|improve this question
    
Your struct constructor could use an ellipsis instead of a parameter pack. –  dyp Jun 18 '14 at 15:22
    
@dyp Do you mean a simple variadic constructor? But wouldn't it violate the rule you have referenced below? –  Constructor Jun 18 '14 at 15:25
    
I mean Iterate(...) {}. The evaluation of the elements of a braced-init-lists is properly sequenced, so the "function argument evaluation order" argument is overruled for Iterate{((void)functor(arguments), 0)...}; –  dyp Jun 18 '14 at 15:26
    
@dyp I see now, thank you. Isn't the form (void)functor(arguments), 0 dangerous due to the possible existence of operator void() in the class decltype(functor(argument))? –  Constructor Jun 18 '14 at 15:34
1  
[class.conv.fct]/1 "A conversion function is never used to convert a (possibly cv-qualified) object to [...], or to (possibly cv-qualified) void." So you can declare one, but it's not going to be used. I conclude it won't cause any trouble. –  dyp Jun 18 '14 at 15:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The calls to functor are now unsequenced. The compiler can call functor with your expanded arguments in any order it wants. As an example, IterateThrough3(functor, 1, 2) could do functor(1); functor(2); or it could do functor(2); functor(1);, whereas the other two always do functor(1); functor(2);.

Section 8.5.4/4 of the standard requires that any expressions inside a {} initialiser are evaluated left-to-right.

Within the initializer-list of a braced-init-list, the initializer-clauses, including any that result from pack expansions (14.5.3), are evaluated in the order in which they appear.

Section 5.2.2/4 states that arguments to a function call can be evaluated in any order.

When a function is called, each parameter (8.3.5) shall be initialized (8.5, 12.8, 12.1) with its corresponding argument. [Note: Such initializations are indeterminately sequenced with respect to each other (1.9) — end note ]

This might not cover the wording of the order of evaluation (which I can't find ATM), but it is well known that arguments to functions are evaluated in an unspecified order. EDIT: see @dyp's comment for a relevant standard quote.

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1  
Could you provide a quote from the standard to confirm your words, please? –  Constructor Jun 18 '14 at 15:15
1  
@Constructor Is a non-normative note sufficient? 1.9/15 "[Note: Value computations and side effects associated with different argument expressions are unsequenced. — end note]" –  dyp Jun 18 '14 at 15:17
    
@dyp All possible links/qoutes are welcome. –  Constructor Jun 18 '14 at 15:18
    
@Constructor See updated comment. The normative text does not, as far as I can see, specifically address function arguments. Those fall under a more general category of the sequencing of different sub-expressions probably. –  dyp Jun 18 '14 at 15:20
2  
@Simple "This might not cover the wording of the order of evaluation" is probably covered by 1.9/15 "Except where noted, evaluations of operands of individual operators and of subexpressions of individual expressions are unsequenced." Normative text, but pretty unspecific –  dyp Jun 18 '14 at 15:23

When you use the variadic lambda, the order of evaluation of arguments is unspecified as per the language specification (which in turn means the evaluation of functor(argument) could be in any order unknown to the programmer). That is the only difference. You can search "order of evaluation of arguments" on this site, you will see many topics on it.

As for the variadic templated constructor approach, that should work as long as you use list-initialization to invoke it, otherwise it would have the same problem as the lambda. Note that GCC (upto 4.8.2) has bug, so this doesn't work, though I don't have any idea whether it is fixed with the recent version of GCC.

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Is this rule applied to any variadic function? –  Constructor Jun 18 '14 at 15:17
    
@Constructor: It is applied to any function. Order of evaluation of function arguments is unspecified. –  Nawaz Jun 18 '14 at 15:20
    
Oh, I can say now that I have once heard about this. :-) Thank you. –  Constructor Jun 18 '14 at 15:23
    
Yes, I know about this strange bug when parameters parameters are passed in the back order. –  Constructor Jun 18 '14 at 15:28

If your goal is to have a one-liner with no external machinery, you can use a lambda that accepts std::initializer_list:

template <typename Functor, typename... Arguments>
void IterateThrough3(Functor functor, Arguments&&... arguments)
{
    [](std::initializer_list<int>){}(
        {((void)functor(std::forward<Arguments>(arguments)), 0)...}
    );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Which could be written as (void)std::initializer_list<int>{((void)functor(arguments), 0)...};, I guess. –  dyp Jun 18 '14 at 18:14
    
@dyp Casting to void doesn't turn off the "unused variable" warning on all compilers, passing to a function via an unnamed parameter is more portable. –  Casey Jun 18 '14 at 18:15
    
Thank you. I have noticed that I completely forgot about std::forward. And nobody has corrected me. :-) –  Constructor Jun 18 '14 at 18:20
    
I think there are several possible ways to do something like this. For example: [](const int(&)[sizeof...(Arguments)]){}({((void)functor(std::forward<Arguments>(argument‌​s)), 0)...}); or [](std::array<int, sizeof...(Arguments)>){}({((void)functor(std::forward<Arguments>(arguments)), 0)...}). But as @dyp noted it is not so interesting here. –  Constructor Jun 18 '14 at 18:21
    
@Casey I do not construct a variable, only a temporary. So the only warning should be something like "expression result unused", which I guess should be silenced by a conversion to void. –  dyp Jun 18 '14 at 18:24

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