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I have an interesting question here that may sound pretty silly, but here goes. Using JQuery's ready function I have defined some functions like so:

$(function(){

  var function1 = function(data){
    //do something
  }

  var function2 = function(data){
    //do something else
  }
});

For some reason, in order for IE to render what I am using correctly, it must be done in the $(document).ready() function. However, I need to trigger these functions once I have a dataset from the server-side. So I thought I would do something like this...

Object.Namespace.callFunction = function(data){
 function1(data);
}

...to be placed outside the ready function in a script so that I could call it directly.

Unfortunately, I know this doesn't work because well, it does not seem logical and I have tried it!. I made all these functions arbitrary because it does not matter the content, but rather the concept. I have also tried using event handlers to trigger the function once I get that data -- to no avail! What is the best way to make functions inside the $(document).ready() global?

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2  
I'm no JQuery expert but why are you not defining the functions as globals in the first place using old-school function function1(data) { ... } blocks? –  Pekka 웃 Mar 11 '10 at 22:07
2  
As others have already said, the answer is simply to define the functions as functions. Why doesn't this work in IE? That is the question. –  harpo Mar 11 '10 at 22:08
    
those were just basic examples. I am also working with ExtJS Slider plugin and for some reason IE will not render them properly unless they are done within the doc.ready(). –  user291928 Mar 11 '10 at 22:18
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you (for stylistic reasons) want to write the function inline with your $(document).ready, You can do it this way:

var app={}; /*Use whatever your apps name is, abbreviated (something short)*/
$(function()
{
  app.function1 = function(data) { };
  app.function2 = function(data) { };
  // now you can call all functions inside and outside this ready function with the app. prefix
  // if you also want a local reference to the function without the app. prefix, you can do:
  var function1 = app.function1 = function(data) { };
});
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or window.functionName (window.app.functionName will work too) –  David Murdoch Mar 11 '10 at 22:30
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If you are defining global functions there is no reason to have them in the document ready. The only things that should go in the document ready are things that need to wait until the document is ready in order to act. Defining function can happen before the document is ready.

// Defining the functions in the global scope.
var function1 = function(data){
    //do something that requires the dom to be ready.
}

var function2 = function(data){
    //do something else that requires the dom to be ready.
}
$(function() {
    // Running the functions when the document is ready.
    function1();
    function2();
});
share|improve this answer
    
I could not agree more...but unfortunately in order to render everything appropriately on the page I need to wait until is is ready. In this case... I cannot call the function directly which I need to be able to do. –  user291928 Mar 11 '10 at 22:10
1  
@user291928 then define the functions outside the document ready and call them when the document is. –  PetersenDidIt Mar 11 '10 at 22:15
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what about

  function function1(data){
    //do something
  }
  function function2(data){
    //do something else
  }

   $(function(){
      // if you need to call inside ready
      function1();
      function2();
   });
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Thanks...I wasn't thinking about wrapping my function call in the ready function. Just seems weird to do from where the code is, but this done work just fine. thanks again. –  user291928 Mar 11 '10 at 22:16
    
This is the way to do it. Actually I usually use a single global object with those functions as properties to keep from polluting the global namespace, but same idea. –  Plynx Mar 11 '10 at 22:17
    
@Plynx, I agree with you, this was such a rush, but that's the main idea, good answer ! –  Jhonny D. Cano -Leftware- Mar 12 '10 at 12:31
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