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How do I force compiler to pick up a template function overload for a base class?

Here is an example that illustrates the question

#include <iostream>

class A
{};

class B : public A
{};

template <class T>
void f (const T& t)
{
    std::cout << "Generic f" << std::endl;
}

void f (const A& a)
{
    std::cout << "Overload for A" << std::endl;
}

template <class T>
void call_f (const T& t)
{
    f (t);  
}

int main() 
{
    call_f (10);
    call_f (A());
    call_f (B());

    return 0;
}

It produces the output

Generic f
Overload for A
Generic f

Why doesn't the compiler pick up f (const A&) in the 3rd case? UPD: OK, this one is clear void f<B> (const B&) is better than void f (const A&), but I'm still looking for answer to the 2nd question.

And is it possible to force it to do so without casting B to A?

share|improve this question
1  
Consider the functions that are available when trying to call f(t) where t has the type B const&: void f<B>(B const&) produced from the function template and void f(A const&). Clearly, the first one is a better match for an lvalue argument of type B const. –  dyp Jun 18 at 16:30
    
You can restrict the types accepted by the function template to types not inherited from A. But I doubt that this is a good idea, since it couples the function template with other functions. Why don't you just add a void f(const B&);? Another possibility is to define a function template that accepts only types inherited from A, forwards to void f(A const&) and is preferred over you current function template. –  dyp Jun 18 at 16:32
    
@dyp, there are hundreds of 'B's that's the problem :) But you are right, 'void f<B>(B const&)' is of course better than 'void f(A const&). Still I want to know if it is possible to hack this –  cppalex Jun 18 at 16:35
    
Does your compiler support C++11? –  dyp Jun 18 at 16:37
1  
C++03 + conversion exploit: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/bace013ef7eef061 –  dyp Jun 18 at 16:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using call_f(B()) results in a call to `f() which is best matched by the template version. For the non-template version a conversion is required. As a result, the template is chosen. If the template and the non-template would be equally good options, the non-template would be preferred.

If you want to the non-template to be called, you'll need to make the template a non-option. for example, the template could be implemented like

#include <type_traits>
template <class T>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_base_of<A, T>::value>::type f(T const&)
{
    std::cout << "Generic f\n";
}

If C++11 can't be used you could either implement a version of std::is_base_of<...>, use a version from Boost or use a simple dispatch:

struct true_type {};
struct false_type {};

true_type A_is_base_of(A const*) { return true_type(); }
false_type A_is_base_of(void const*) { return false_type(); }

template <class T>
void f (T const&, false_type)
{
    std::cout << "Generic f\n";
}

void f (A const&, true_type)
{
    std::cout << "Overload for A\n";
}

template <class T>
void call_f (const T& t)
{
    f (t, A_is_base_of(&t));  
}
share|improve this answer

I think this actually is possible. The trick is to make use of the fact that overload resolution prefers pretty much anything to a C-style variadic function argument. That way we can create helper functions that support tagged dispatch by constructing the appropriate tag for us. Overload resolution of the helper function forces the compiler to remove the generic template function from its list of candidate functions, leaving only the specialized function.

This is a lot more clear with code, so let's take a look.

#include <iostream>

struct foo {};
struct bar : public foo {};

struct generic_tag {};
struct     foo_tag {};

generic_tag make_tag(...) {
  return generic_tag();
}

foo_tag make_tag(foo const *) {
  return foo_tag();
}

template<typename T>
void f(T const &t, generic_tag) {
  std::cout << "Generic" << std::endl;
}

void f(foo const &f, foo_tag) {
  std::cout << "Specialized" << std::endl;
}

template<typename T>
void call_f(T const &t) {
  // This is the secret sauce.  The call to make_tag(t) will always
  // select the most specialized overload of make_tag() available.
  // The generic make_tag() will only be called if the compiler can't
  // find some other valid version of make_tag().

  f(t, make_tag(&t));
}

int main() {
  call_f(   10); // Prints "Generic"
  call_f(foo()); // Prints "Specialized"
  call_f(bar()); // Prints "Specialized"
}

I verified this solution works on Ununtu 14.04 using GCC 4.8.2.

share|improve this answer
    
C++1y/n3797, [expr.call]/7 "Passing a potentially-evaluated argument of class type (Clause 9) having a non- trivial copy constructor, a non-trivial move constructor, or a non-trivial destructor, with no corresponding parameter [i.e. matching an ellipsis ...], is conditionally-supported with implementation-defined semantics." That's why Dietmar Kühl (supposedly) and me have used pointers instead of references for the tag dispatching. Instead of an ellipsis, you can also use a void const*. –  dyp Jun 18 at 22:35
    
Ah, the void const * version is what I was originally going for, but I didn't use the trampoline function to get the needed indirection. Very nice. In my version the tag type does not have a non-trivial copy constructor, move constructor, or destructor, so I don't think the cited clause applies. –  Chris Hayden Jun 18 at 22:44
    
Dumb. You're right. Edited to use a pointer instead. –  Chris Hayden Jun 18 at 22:46

Assuming that you know that what you are calling call_f on will always be a derived type of A, you can simply explicitly ask for that version of the template, like so:

call_f<A> (B());

If you actually call it with a type that is not convertible to A, like a third class

class C {};

You should get a compiler error addressing this problem (along the lines of "error C2664: 'call_f' : cannot convert parameter 1 from 'C' to 'const A &")

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