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I want that my for loop should not be executed at once, but wait for timeout after each iteration. For eg :

for(var i=0; i<10; i++) {
    console.log(i);
    //wait for 1000
}

I found many solutions on stack-overflow like this one :

for (var i=0;i<=10;i++) {
   (function(ind) {
       setTimeout(function(){console.log(ind);}, 3000);
   })(i);
}

But in all the implementations, the loop waits for 3000 initially and then executes the whole for loop at once. Is there a way that each iteration is called after waiting for 1000.

share|improve this question
    
Javascript doesn't have methods to pause execution for x seconds and then continue with the next line. It simply doesn't work that way. Instead you must break your work into chunks of work and then schedule the next chunk using setTimeout() or setInterval() or some other event which triggers a callback. –  jfriend00 Jun 18 at 19:40

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can work that out with simple math :

for (var i=0;i<=10;i++) {
   (function(ind) {
       setTimeout(function(){console.log(ind);}, 1000 + (3000 * ind));
   })(i);
}

1000ms : 0
4000ms : 1
7000ms : 2
10000ms : 3
13000ms : 4
...


Following the comments

It seem that your request is a bit blurry. if you want to do something after the last timeout, you can set a limit and compare the current index :

var limit = 10
for (var i=0;i<=limit;i++) {
   (function(ind) {
       setTimeout(function(){
           console.log(ind);
           if(ind === limit){
               console.log('It was the last one');
           }
       }, 1000 + (3000 * ind));
   })(i);
}

Fiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/Tn4A7/


I think I know what you want...

and it is to simply do

for (var i=0;i<=10;i++) {
   (function(ind) {
       setTimeout(function(){console.log(ind);}, 1000 * ind);
   })(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure that's exactly what the OP wants either (although it's definitely better). I think they want to wait until all the timeouts have fired and then continue. –  Matt Burland Jun 18 at 19:25
    
Maybe this doesn't matter - and it's certainly not Gagnon's fault, this is how the question presented it - but you do realize that the execution of the script is long past the for-loop even before the first console.log right? See: jsfiddle.net/WXkLK –  myfunkyside Jun 18 at 19:30
    
@myfunkyside Yes i know that, but I just cant really tell what OP want... –  Karl-André Gagnon Jun 18 at 19:31
    
@Karl-AndréGagnon - I know, I know, that's why I started off with clearing you of any blame –  myfunkyside Jun 18 at 19:45
    
@myfunkyside fair enough, as long as my name is clear! :) –  Karl-André Gagnon Jun 18 at 19:48

why not use something like this:

var i = 0
var id = window.setInterval(function(){
    if(i >= 10) {
        clearInterval(id);
        return;
    }

    console.log(i);
    i++;
}, 1000)
share|improve this answer

This works:

function initiateTimeOut(i) {
  setTimeout(function() { doStuff(i) }, 30);
}
function doStuff(i) {
    console.log(i);
    i++;
    if (i <= 10) {
        initiateTimeOut(i); 
    }
}

initiateTimeOut(0);

this way you will only increment i when your function executes, which i believe is what your looking for.

Example in a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/My7Zg/


Or, even shorter (http://jsfiddle.net/My7Zg/1/):

function customLoop(i) {
    console.log(i);
    i++;
    if (i<=10) {setTimeout(function(){customLoop(i);},1000);}
}
customLoop(0);
share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't that give a stack error? –  Karl-André Gagnon Jun 18 at 19:19
1  
Actually, all you are going to do is lock up your browser. You'll loop continuously setting more timeout until your browser gives up. –  Matt Burland Jun 18 at 19:19
    
1) I doubt this works as you think, 2) this is not what the OP wanted. –  Marcell Fülöp Jun 18 at 19:20
1  
This actually hanged my pc. –  Parag Gangil Jun 18 at 19:22
2  
Yep, this is BAD. Please revise or remove. –  Marcell Fülöp Jun 18 at 19:25

jsBin demo

DON'T make functions within for loops, instead:

(function fn(n) {   
  console.log( n );   
  if(n<9)setTimeout(function(){  fn(++n);  },1000);
}( 0 ));

the above will log ten numbers from 0 - 9
(just like for your for loop would).

share|improve this answer

You can approach your situation in two ways.

  1. You can immedately schedule a whole bunch of setTimeout() calls with varying times so they will execute at the desired times in the future (other answers here illustrate how to do that).

  2. You can execute the first iteration, schedule the next iteration and have the execution of the next iteration schedule the one after that until you've finished the desired number of iterations. This is ultimately a bit more scalable than setting a lot of setTimeout() call and gives you more branching/logic freedom because you are in control of what happens next after each iteration.

This second option using a more general purpose utility function would look like this:

// utility function to call a callback numTimes, 
// separated by delay milliseconds
function runIteration(fn, numTimes, delay) {
    var cnt = 0;
    function next() {
        // call the callback and stop iterating if it returns false
        if (fn(cnt) === false) return;
        ++cnt;
        // if not finished with desired number of iterations,
        // schedule the next iteration
        if (cnt < numTimes) {
            setTimeout(next, delay);
        }
    }
    // start first iteration
    next();

}

So, to execute your console statement, you'd do this:

runIteration(function(i) {
    console.log(i);
}, 10, 1000);

Working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/HqCZ3/

This could also be extended with a 2nd callback function that was called when the iteration was complete (useful in some circumstances) or it could return a promise that is resolved when the iterations are complete.

Here's what a version that returns a promise would look like: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/XtJ69/

// utility function to call a callback numTimes, 
// separated by delay milliseconds
function runIteration(fn, numTimes, delay) {
    var d = $.Deferred();
    var cnt = 0;

    function end() {
        d.resolve();
    }

    function next() {
        // call the callback and stop iterating if
        // it returns false
        if (fn(cnt) === false) {
            end();
            return;
        }
        ++cnt;
        // if not finished with desired number of iterations,
        // schedule the next iteration
        if (cnt < numTimes) {
            setTimeout(next, delay);
        } else {
            end();
        }
    }
    // start first iteration
    next();
    return d.promise();
}


runIteration(function(i) {
    log(i);
}, 10, 1000).done(function() {
    log("done");
});
share|improve this answer
for (var i=0;i<=10;i++) {
   (function(ind) {
       setTimeout(function(){console.log((ind + 1)*1000, ':', ind);}, 1000 * (ind+1) );
   })(i);
}

Output:

1000 : 0
2000 : 1
3000 : 2
4000 : 3
5000 : 4
6000 : 5
7000 : 6
8000 : 7
9000 : 8
10000 : 9
11000 : 10

WORKING DEMO

share|improve this answer

This is a solution with a simple timeout... Maybe it does not match exactly with what you expect, but trying to make a "pause" with javascript is not a good approach in my advice. I suggest you to search an other way to do what you want. Fiddle

window.my_condition = true;
window.my_i = 0;

function interate() {
    console.log(window.my_i);
    // ... your code
    if (window.my_condition!==false) {
        window.my_i++;
        setTimeout(interate,300);
    }
}

interate();
share|improve this answer

@Karl-André Gagnon's answer is great with the exception that the OP does NOT want an initial wait time so in the first iteration we divide by zero:

for (var i=0;i<=10;i++) {
   (function(ind) {
       setTimeout(function(){console.log(ind);}, 3000 * (ind - 1));
   })(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Be aware that in the first loop, ind is equal to 0. So 3000 * (ind - 1) === -3000. –  Karl-André Gagnon Jun 18 at 19:32

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