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I have a data frame in R that looks like this:

st  cd  ct   bg  bg2  pop
1   1   al   5   5.4  99
1   1   al   2   4.2  93
1   1   al   6   3.9  93
1   1   al   8   53.  45
1   1   al   1   5.4  08

How can I subset it so that the data frame is split up into two data frames, that contain all values except ones that are repeated in the last column? For example, the above data frame would be subset-ted into:

st  cd  ct   bg  bg2  pop
1   1   al   5   5.4  99
1   1   al   2   4.2  93
1   1   al   8   53.  45
1   1   al   1   5.4  08

and

st  cd  ct   bg  bg2  pop
1   1   al   5   5.4  99
1   1   al   6   3.9  93
1   1   al   8   53.  45
1   1   al   1   5.4  08

Since 93 is repeated twice in the last column, pop, it would be split up, with one row into one data frame, and one row into another? Is there an easy way to do this?

Thanks for all the help.

share|improve this question

How about this:

df1 = df[!duplicated(df[["pop"]], fromLast=TRUE), ]
df2 = df[!duplicated(df[["pop"]], fromLast=FALSE), ]

This also relies on the fact that nothing is duplicated more than once.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately there are many duplications and it is a very large data set. Do you have any other suggestions? – user2395969 Jun 18 '14 at 23:42
    
If it is a very large data set and there are many duplicates, it is probably a bad idea to make so many copies anyway. Why don't you ask a question regarding what you want to achieve with this separation. This step may not be required at all. – asb Jun 19 '14 at 4:28
    
I want to sum the columns bg and bg2 for each of the two new data frames created – user2395969 Jun 20 '14 at 11:04
    
If more than one value of pop is duplicated (for example, 99,99,93,93,45) would you need 4 versions of the data -- that is, one for every possible combination of duplicated values? – AndrewMacDonald Jun 21 '14 at 14:05
    
No, I don't want all possible combinations, I just want the two datasets: one with the first occurrence, and one with the second occurrence. – user2395969 Jun 23 '14 at 13:35

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