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In SQL we can see if a string is in a list like so:

Column IN ('a', 'b', 'c')

What's a good way to do this in javascript? It's so clunky to do this:

if (expression1 || expression2 || str === 'a' || str === 'b' || str === 'c') {
   // do something
}

And I'm not sure about the performance or clarity of this:

if (expression1 || expression2 || {a:1, b:1, c:1}[str]) {
   // do something
}

Or one could use the switch function:

var str = 'a',
   flag = false;

switch (str) {
   case 'a':
   case 'b':
   case 'c':
      flag = true;
   default:
}

if (expression1 || expression2 || flag) {
   // do something
}

But that is a horrible mess. Any ideas?

UPDATE

I didn't think to mention that in this case, I have to use IE as it's for a corporate intranet page. So ['a', 'b', 'c'].indexOf(str) !== -1 won't work natively without some syntax sugar.

For browsers that don't support indexOf here's a fully standards compliant version of the indexOf function. And here's my version (since I don't care about list position or mind traversing in reverse, this should be faster):

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
   Array.prototype.indexOf = function(item) {
      var i = this.length;
      while (i--) {
         if (this[i] === item) return i;
      }
   }
   return -1;
}
share|improve this question

12 Answers 12

You can call indexOf:

if (['a', 'b', 'c'].indexOf(str) >= 0) {
    //do something
}
share|improve this answer
8  
The only problem with Array.prototype.indexOf is that it will not work on IE, sadly even IE8 lacks this method. –  CMS Mar 12 '10 at 2:24
2  
But you can define it if you want to. See soledadpenades.com/2007/05/17/arrayindexof-in-internet-explorer –  Jason Hall Mar 12 '10 at 2:35
    
Here are the "real" goods: developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/… –  ErikE Mar 12 '10 at 2:42
6  
@ImJasonH: The code on that page is really really bad IMHO, for example, the check if Array.indexOf exists before overriding Array.prototype.indexOf which are not the same thing. I would recommend the implementation made by Mozilla available here: developer.mozilla.org/En/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Objects/… –  CMS Mar 12 '10 at 2:43
1  
Listen to @CMS, @Emtucifor, the Mozilla implementation is a lot better. –  Jason Hall Mar 12 '10 at 4:32

Most of the answers suggest the Array.prototype.indexOf method, the only problem is that it will not work on any IE version.

As an alternative I leave you two more options that will work on all browsers:

if (/Foo|Bar|Baz/.test(str)) {
  // ...
}


if (str.match("Foo|Bar|Baz")) {
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, thanks for mentioning that, CMS. It just so happens that this is for a corporate intranet and they use... guess what... IE. Since the regular expression method gives me the willies, I'll either have to make a function that loops, or use the object method I suggested in my post (third code block). –  ErikE Mar 12 '10 at 2:26
up vote 8 down vote accepted

SLaks' answer was a good start, but not "correct" because it doesn't work in IE. While I didn't mention the need for IE in my initial post, he didn't mention his code doesn't work in IE, either.

I eventually used the indexOf() function, and "rolled my own" for IE:

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
   Array.prototype.indexOf = function(item) {
      var i = this.length;
      while (i--) {
         if (this[i] === item) return i;
      }
      return -1;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
here's another good PolyFill for indexOf provided by MDN. It basically does the same thing but with a couple of short circuits for easy evaluation. –  KyleMit Jan 21 at 21:24

A trick I've used is

>>> ("something" in {"a string":"", "somthing":"", "another string":""})
false
>>> ("something" in {"a string":"", "something":"", "another string":""})
true

You could do something like

>>> a = ["a string", "something", "another string"];
>>> b = {};
>>> for(var i=0; i<a.length;i++){b[a[i]]="";} /* Transform the array in a dict */
>>> ("something" in b)
true
share|improve this answer
    
voyager, is using "in" any faster/slower/better/worse than just attempting to dereference the item as my third code block in my question showed? Also, if you're going to loop through the thing, I figure you may as well check if the element's in the array at that time... just wrap the loop in a function. And for what it's worth var i=a.length;while (i--) {/*use a[i]*/} is the fastest loop method (if reverse order is acceptable). –  ErikE Mar 12 '10 at 2:31
    
@Emtucifor: it really depends on what you are doing, and I guess that it might work differently on different javascript engines. If your data would need at any point the use of a dictionary, then it is better to create it this way. I'd think that this will be faster because of implementation details on the engines (the use of hash tables for object) once the dict object is created. –  voyager Mar 12 '10 at 2:38

Arrays have an indexOf method which can be used to search for strings:

js> a = ['foo', 'bar', 'baz']
foo,bar,baz
js> a.indexOf('bar')
1
js> a.indexOf('quux')
-1
share|improve this answer
    
Aha! That seems to be as close as I can get. Thanks. I gave you the answer because you answered first. Though I would be using SLaks' syntax. –  ErikE Mar 12 '10 at 2:17
1  
This will fail on older browsers. –  epascarello Mar 12 '10 at 2:25
    
Oops... mentioning that this doesn't work in IE would have been nice. :) –  ErikE Mar 12 '10 at 2:26
1  
@epascarello: Not only in older browsers, it will fail on any IE, even in IE8 :( –  CMS Mar 12 '10 at 2:27
    
ah. IE. yes, I see. –  harto Mar 12 '10 at 2:42

Looks like you need to use in_array function.

jQuery -> inArray

Prototype -> Array.indexOf

Or, see these examples if you are not using jQuery or Prototype:

Stylistic note: variables named thisthing thatthing, should be named to tell you something about what they contain (noun).

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, they weren't variables but were meant as random placeholders for expressions... just an example of how I planned to use the script. –  ErikE Mar 12 '10 at 2:13

Thanks for the question, and the solution using the Array.indexOf method.

I used the code from this solution to create a inList() function that would, IMO, make the writing simpler and the reading clearer:

function inList(psString, psList) 
{
    var laList = psList.split(',');

    var i = laList.length;
    while (i--) {
        if (laList[i] === psString) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

USAGE:

if (inList('Houston', 'LA,New York,Houston') {
  // THEN do something when your string is in the list
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Javascript array literals are so easy, I don't see why you would split when you could do 'Houston'.inList(['LA', 'New York', 'Houston']). Perhaps if (!String.prototype.inList) {String.prototype.inList = function(arr) {return arr.indexOf(this) >= 0};} or using your while method. –  ErikE Aug 27 '11 at 7:28

In addition to indexOf (which other posters have suggested), using prototype's Enumberable.include() can make this more neat and concise:

var list = ['a', 'b', 'c'];
if (list.include(str)) {
  // do stuff
}
share|improve this answer

Here's mine:

String.prototype.inList=function(list){
 return ( Array.apply(null, arguments).indexOf(this.toString()) != -1)
}

var x = 'abc';
if (x.inList('aaa','bbb','abc') )
  console.log('yes');
else
  console.log('no');

this one is faster if you're ok with passing an array:

String.prototype.inList=function(list){
   return ( list.indexOf(this.toString()) != -1)
}

var x = 'abc';
if (x.inList(['aaa','bbb','abc']) )
   console.log('yes')

Here's the jsperf: http://jsperf.com/bmcgin-inlsit

share|improve this answer
    
shortest way so far –  Mephiztopheles Dec 9 at 10:24

I'm surprised no one had mentioned a simple function that takes a string and a list.

function in_list(needle, hay)
{
    var i, len;

    for (i = 0, len = hay.length; i < len; i++)
    {
        if (hay[i] == needle) { return true; }
    }

    return false;
}

var alist = ["test"];

console.log(in_list("test", alist));
share|improve this answer
    
Jim did exactly what you suggest, Sam, on Aug 27 '11 at 1:29. In fact, my selected answer is pretty much the same thing, just supplying the string with this rather than a parameter. –  ErikE Sep 20 '12 at 9:51
    
@ErikE Sorry, Jims answer seemed odd to me as you said. And your accepted answer returns an int, where as some people might come across this question looking for a bool return. Figured it might help a few people. –  Sam Sep 20 '12 at 17:54

A simplified version of SLaks' answer also works:

if ('abcdefghij'.indexOf(str) >= 0) {
    //do something
}

....since strings are sort of arrays themselves. :)

If needed, implement the indexof function for ie as described before me.

share|improve this answer
    
This will only work with single-letter strings, which was NOT intended. –  ErikE Sep 27 '13 at 17:27

I'm a little late to the party, but my solution results in syntax like this:

// checking to see if var 'column' is in array ['a', 'b', 'c']

if (column.isAmong(['a', 'b', 'c']) { 
  // do something
}

and I implement this by extending the basic Object prototype, like this:

Object.prototype.isAmong = function (MyArray){                      
   for (var a=0; a<MyArray.length; a++) {                   
      if (this === MyArray[a]) { return true;}          
   }                                                        
   return false;                                            
}  

We might alternatively name the method isInArray (but probably not inArray) or simply isIn.

Advantages: simple and straightforward, self-documenting.

share|improve this answer
    
There could be trouble extending Object. bolinfest.com/javascript/inheritance.php under "The Google Maps team learned this the hard way" and incompatibility with browser implementation or other user's code. I still think ErikE's answer is the best one since iterating over an array is slower than finding a key in a hashmap once the hashmap is created: myValues[key]; where myValues is an object and key is any string or number. –  HMR Nov 12 '13 at 5:38

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