Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to use a Textile (preferably instead of Markdown), and am looking for a nice WYSIWYM (not WYSIWYG, because of this) JQuery editor.

I've seen these:

  • WMD - Markdown, Stack Overflow uses it
  • MarkItUp - Textile support but I don't know if it's WYSIWYM
  • WYMEditor

Which one supports both good HTML output and Textile?

Update: I only use Markdown now, mainly because it generates slightly more semantic html and it's much more widely adopted. That, and you can use the Cloud9 Ace Editor (source on GitHub) for not only markdown but everything TextMate does.

share|improve this question
    
Been watching this question for months and it seems there's none! Have you had any luck finding it elsewhere? –  Ramon Tayag Nov 23 '10 at 8:32
    
nope, there are none! –  Lance Pollard Aug 1 '11 at 20:50
    
Aloha Editor is a new find of mine as well. Not exactly what you asked, but related. –  Ramon Tayag Dec 21 '11 at 15:56

5 Answers 5

Use Textile.js which is a fully featured Textile parser in JavaScript!

Use can try out the Textile live web editor here http://borgar.github.com/textile-js/

I am using it in combination with Markitup

Here is my simple code:

$(document).ready(function () {
    init();
});

function init() {
    var $content = $('.markitup'); // my textarea
    var $preview = $('#textile-preview'); // the preview div

    $content.markItUp(mySettings); // init markitup

    // use a simple timer to check if the textarea content has changed
    var value = $content.val();
    setInterval(function () {
        var newValue = $content.val();
        if (value != newValue) {
            value = newValue;
            $preview.html(textile.convert(newValue)); // convert the textile to html
        }
    }, 500);
};
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not too familiar with nodejs... but it is my understanding that it is something you cannot install on a shared web hosting server? They either come with it or not right? If that's the case, is it possible to use textile.js ? (because I saw $ npm install textilejs in the installation instructions and I cannot install node package mgr on my shared web hosting). +1 for the introduction to Textile.js though, it looks very promising. –  Logan Dec 2 '12 at 4:49
1  
It's just javascript and can be used in a browser, on in a node.js app :) To use it in the browser just reference it like any other script. Have a look at how he is using it here: borgar.github.com/textile-js Just view source –  superlogical Dec 3 '12 at 2:45

There isn't anything that fits what you're asking for out of the box.

I think WYM editor is the best starting point. I does not come with Textile support out of the box, but it can be easily extended. RDFaCE is also WYSIWYM.

MarkItUp is not WYSIWYM.

share|improve this answer
    
What makes you say MarkItUp is not WYSIWYM? I thought that's exactly what it was. I'm confused. –  PKKid Jun 28 '11 at 0:16

I recently stumbled on the aptly named Jquery WYSIWYM markdown editor. With Markdown support and a solid jQuery back-end it works well for my needs.

It is available under Creative Commons and you can view the code below: http://mjs7231.bitbucket.org/jquery-wysiwym/examples/markdown.live.html

share|improve this answer
2  
The editor demo was moved: mjs7231.bitbucket.org/jquery-wysiwym/examples/… –  PKKid Apr 23 '12 at 0:15

Sanskrit seems to do WYSIWYG for Textile. See also: Rails, Textile, and javascript WYSIWYG roundup.

share|improve this answer
    
He's looking for a WYSIWYM :) But Sanskrit looks cool though. –  Ramon Tayag Mar 13 '11 at 15:28

If you are mostly interested in valid (X)HTML output and not strict on jQuery, you can look at Xinha - http://xinha.webfactional.com/

It's a nice editor, keeps generated code clean and is pretty stable (with lots of plugins and abilities).

share|improve this answer
    
not jquery based. –  h0tw1r3 Jun 14 '11 at 19:09
2  
I did say (hint) in my answer that it doesn't use jQuery - sorry if it was confusing. –  Ivan Peevski Jun 20 '11 at 7:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.