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I'm using Python 2.5. I'm trying to use this 'with' statement.

from __future__ import with_statement
a = []
with open('exampletxt.txt','r') as f:
    while True:
        a.append(f.next().strip().split())
print a

The contents of 'exampletxt.txt' are simple:

a
b

In this case, I get the error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/tmp/python-7036sVf.py", line 5, in <module>
    a.append(f.next().strip().split())
StopIteration

And if I replace f.next() with f.read(), it seems to be caught in an infinite loop.

I wonder if I have to write a decorator class that accepts the iterator object as an argument, and define an __exit__ method for it?

I know it's more pythonic to use a for-loop for iterators, but I wanted to implement a while loop within a generator that's called by a for-loop... something like

def g(f):
    while True:
        x = f.next()
        if test1(x):
            a = x
        elif test2(x):
            b = f.next()
            yield [a,x,b]

a = []
with open(filename) as f:
    for x in g(f):
        a.append(x)
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2  
nothing to do with with ... ? –  stefanB Mar 12 '10 at 4:29
    
yes, appears so. i thought the 'with' statement provided an alternative form for exception handling but i guess not in this way. –  crippledlambda Mar 12 '10 at 4:36
    
Please update the title. –  S.Lott Mar 12 '10 at 11:37
    
Thanks, but it really was a question of applicability of the with statement in this case. –  crippledlambda Mar 14 '10 at 10:45
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Raising StopIteration is what an iterator does when it gets to the end. Normally the for statement catches it silently and continues to the else clause, but if it's being iterated manually as in your case then the code has to be prepared to handle the exception itself.

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Thanks. I guess I thought the 'with' statement was supposed to handle that exception as well, but guess not... –  crippledlambda Mar 12 '10 at 4:32
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Your while loop doesn't end, but the file does so it raises a StopIteration exception when there is nothing else to iterate to.

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You don't have any terminating condition in any of your while loops, so you keep returning until you get StopIteration exception which you don't handle.

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You can always rewrite while-with-explicit-next loops. When you have an explicit next, you're just looking ahead one token.

Generally, loops of this form can be rewritten.

def g(f):
    while True:
        x = f.next()
        if test1(x):
            a = x
        elif test2(x):
            b = f.next()
            yield [a,x,b]

You can always replace a look-ahead next by buffering a value.

def g(f):
    prev, a = None, None
    for x in f:
        if test2(prev)
            yield [ a, prev, x ]
        elif test1(x):
            a = x
        prev= x
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Thank you - looks like the for-loop is the way to go in handling these iterators. –  crippledlambda Mar 14 '10 at 10:45
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