Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class CheckStore {
    private String displayText;
    private boolean state;
    private String meaningfulText;
    private URL url;

    public CheckStore(String text, boolean state) {
        this.displayText = text;
        this.state = state;
    }
    :
    :
}

As I am initializing only two variables (displayText and state) in the constructor, Will the rest two variables (meaningfulText and url which will have the value null) will require space in memory to store null value.

Q1. I think they will require space. If they will, then how much memory does a null value takes in the memory (like int takes 4 bytes).

Q2. How much space a string takes in memory. I guess it will depend on the length of the string. So how much space a string takes of how much length?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

In Java, null is just a value that a reference (which is basically a restricted pointer) can have. It means that the reference refers to nothing. In this case you still consume the space for the reference. This is 4 bytes on 32-bit systems or 8 bytes on 64-bit systems. However, you're not consuming any space for the class that the reference points to until you actually allocate an instance of that class to point the reference at.

Edit: As far as the String, a String in Java takes 16 bits (2 bytes) for each character, plus a small amount of book-keeping overhead, which is probably undocumented and implementation specific.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please also tell me the reason why it takes diff. space on 64-bit and 32-bit systems? –  Yatendra Goel Mar 12 '10 at 5:28
    
@Yatendra: Pointers have to be big enough to span the entire address space. Therefore, on a 32-bit machine you need 32 bits. On a 64-bit machine you need 64 bits. –  dsimcha Mar 12 '10 at 5:29
6  
Not necessarily... there's some interesting work in HotSpot to avoid this: wikis.sun.com/display/HotSpotInternals/CompressedOops –  Jon Skeet Mar 12 '10 at 6:28
1  
@Jon Skeet: Very interesting, I was not aware of that. I'll rephrase, them: In the absence of JIT optimizations that are extremely clever and not guaranteed, you need 64-bit references if you have 64-bit address space. –  dsimcha Mar 12 '10 at 16:06
1  
@Knownasilya: It's moved to wikis.oracle.com/display/HotSpotInternals/CompressedOops –  Jon Skeet Dec 29 '12 at 22:02

I'd like to add:

  1. variable of reference type will be initialized as null value.
  2. null is not object. because (null instanceof Object) equals to false
  3. there is only one null value in JVM. No matter how many variables refer to null.

    Object s = (String)null;

    Object i = (Integer)null;

    System.out.println(s == i);//true

share|improve this answer

You can use jol to get the layout of that class. (However be careful, you might need a deeper understanding on the mechanics behind it, don't blindly trust the result and be aware it is just an estimate for the currently used VM (1.7.0_76 x64 win in my case:):

I use the CLI version I guess the proper method would be to include the library in your project, but anyway, it seems to work this way:

test>java -cp target\classes;jol-cli-0.3.1-full.jar org.openjdk.jol.Main internals test.CheckStore
Running 64-bit HotSpot VM.
Using compressed oop with 0-bit shift.
Using compressed klass with 0-bit shift.
Objects are 8 bytes aligned.
Field sizes by type: 4, 1, 1, 2, 2, 4, 4, 8, 8 [bytes]
Array element sizes: 4, 1, 1, 2, 2, 4, 4, 8, 8 [bytes]

VM fails to invoke the default constructor, falling back to class-only introspection.

test.CheckStore object internals:
 OFFSET  SIZE    TYPE DESCRIPTION                    VALUE
      0    12         (object header)                N/A
     12     1 boolean CheckStore.state               N/A
     13     3         (alignment/padding gap)        N/A
     16     4  String CheckStore.displayText         N/A
     20     4  String CheckStore.meaningfulText      N/A
     24     4     URL CheckStore.url                 N/A
     28     4         (loss due to the next object alignment)
Instance size: 32 bytes (estimated, the sample instance is not available)
Space losses: 3 bytes internal + 4 bytes external = 7 bytes total

and the same with automatic compressed oops off:

test>java -XX:-UseCompressedOops -cp target\classes;jol-cli-0.3.1-full.jar org.openjdk.jol.Main internals test.CheckStore
Running 64-bit HotSpot VM.
Objects are 8 bytes aligned.
Field sizes by type: 8, 1, 1, 2, 2, 4, 4, 8, 8 [bytes]
Array element sizes: 8, 1, 1, 2, 2, 4, 4, 8, 8 [bytes]

VM fails to invoke the default constructor, falling back to class-only  introspection.

test.CheckStore object internals:
 OFFSET  SIZE    TYPE DESCRIPTION                    VALUE
      0    16         (object header)                N/A
     16     1 boolean CheckStore.state               N/A
     17     7         (alignment/padding gap)        N/A
     24     8  String CheckStore.displayText         N/A
     32     8  String CheckStore.meaningfulText      N/A
     40     8     URL CheckStore.url                 N/A
Instance size: 48 bytes (estimated, the sample instance is not available)
Space losses: 7 bytes internal + 0 bytes external = 7 bytes total

Those are only the layouts for the object itself if your fields are null, then it will not point to more objects, otherwise you have to look at the target types (URL and String) as well. (And if you have multiple instances of all of them it depends if you use the same multiple times or different ones). An null field cannot be skipped in memory, as it would require the instance to be resized when it is assigned. So the fields are all pre-constructed, they just do not reference allocated objects somewhere else on the heap.

NB: you get some more details if you implement a default constructor, but the sizing in this specific case would be the same. In case you wonder where the sequence and padding of fields is coming from, you can check this article - (basically it aligns objects on 8 bytes, sorts fields by size, groups same type together, references last. Fields from super types are first, 4 byte aligned.)

share|improve this answer

If an object is null, that simply means that the memory chunk allocated for that object is "empty", or "zero'd" out. In that regard, it doesn't make sense to think of null as something that has a size; it's "size" is simply the size of the object that it is null'ing out.

To provide some background on why this is: When you create an instance of your class, memory must be allocated for every single one of its member fields, regardless of their value (i.e., if they're explicitly initialized or not). If you don't initialize a member field, then that chunk of memory specifically for the field will contain the appropriate default value.

share|improve this answer
4  
Downvote? Please explain why. I'd like to learn something here rather than just fail. –  Nate W. Mar 12 '10 at 5:32
3  
I didn't vote, but I agree that the answer is a bit incoherent. For example, it's "size" is simply the size of the object that it is null'ing out. doesn't make sense. You make it sound like if I have a class with a member Foo bar where Foo is a 200-byte object, then 200 bytes would be used if bar is null. Since bar is actually just a reference to a Foo, only a few bytes (the size of a reference) will be used. –  Gabe Mar 12 '10 at 5:47
2  
A null reference doesn't allocate memory for an object at all. Indeed, there's no such concept as a "null object". There's just a null reference, which is the same size as any other reference. –  Jon Skeet Mar 12 '10 at 6:28
    
@gabe Ahh yes - you're right, I forgot to consider the fact that 'bar' is just a reference. –  Nate W. Mar 12 '10 at 6:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.