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The following code is accepted by VC++ 2013, but rejected by clang 3.4.

Which compiler is right as per the C++ standard?

template<class T>
struct A
{
    T n;
};

template<class T>
struct B : A<T>
{
    // VC++ 2013 : OK
    // clang : error : use of class template 'A' requires template arguments
    B& f1(const A& obj) 
    {
        return *this;
    }

    // VC++ : OK
    // clang : OK
    B& f2(const A<T>& obj)
    {
        return *this;
    }
};

int main()
{
    B<int> b;
}
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2  
Note that g++ emits an errors too (coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/38c78abd3f098143). –  Jarod42 Jun 19 '14 at 13:30
    
Looks like a prime candidate for the language-lawyer tag, but you're at 5 already... –  Angew Jun 19 '14 at 13:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

My first instinct is to say VC++ is right in this one. Lookup of the name A in B should find the injected-class-name A inside A<T>, which can also be used as a type-name to refer to A<T>.

C++11 [temp.local]:

1 Like normal (non-template) classes, class templates have an injected-class-name (Clause 9). The injected-class-name can be used as a template-name or a type-name. When it is used with a template-argument-list, as a template-argument for a template template-parameter, or as the final identifier in the elaborated-type-specifier of a friend class template declaration, it refers to the class template itself. Otherwise, it is equivalent to the template-name followed by the template-parameters of the class template enclosed in <>.

2 ...

3 The injected-class-name of a class template or class template specialization can be used either as a template-name or a type-name wherever it is in scope. [ Example:

template <class T> struct Base {
  Base* p;
};

template <class T> struct Derived: public Base<T> {
  typename Derived::Base* p; // meaning Derived::Base<T>
};

However, at the same time, [temp.dep]§3 states:

3 In the definition of a class or class template, if a base class depends on a template-parameter, the base class scope is not examined during unqualified name lookup either at the point of definition of the class template or member or during an instantiation of the class template or member.

Based on this, I'd more inclined to say that clang is actually right, since the injected-class-name A is inside the scope of A<T>, which depends on B's template parameter T and is thus not searched during unqualified name lookup. Secondary evidence to support this would be the fact that the example from [temp.local] uses Derived::Base instead of just Base.

So in total, I'd say that

  1. it's a nice corner-case, and

  2. clang is actually right not to examine the scope of A<T>

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1  
14.6.1/3 (in n3337, if it's relevant) –  jrok Jun 19 '14 at 13:20
    
@jrok Thanks, was looking at it. However, I had to reformulate my conclusion eventually, based on 14.6.2/3 –  Angew Jun 19 '14 at 13:30

Clang is correct; although the injected-class-name of the class template A is certainly visible within A<T> and so visible within the derived class B<T>, it is a dependent name and so the base class scope is not examined within B<T>.

Dependent name base class scope lookup is discussed in 14.6.2p3:

In the definition of a class or class template, if a base class depends on a template-parameter, the base class scope is not examined during unqualified name lookup either at the point of definition of the class template or member or during an instantiation of the class template or member.

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