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I read this article where Ayende states NHibernate can (compared to EF 4):

  • Collection with lazy=”extra” – Lazy extra means that NHibernate adapts to the operations that you might run on top of your collections. That means that blog.Posts.Count will not force a load of the entire collection, but rather would create a “select count(*) from Posts where BlogId = 1” statement, and that blog.Posts.Contains() will likewise result in a single query rather than paying the price of loading the entire collection to memory.
  • Collection filters and paged collections - this allows you to define additional filters (including paging!) on top of your entities collections, which means that you can easily page through the blog.Posts collection, and not have to load the entire thing into memory.

So I decided to put together a test case. I created the cliché Blog model as a simple demonstration, with two classes as follows:

public class Blog
{
    public virtual int Id { get; private set;  }
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Post> Posts { get; private set;  }

    public virtual void AddPost(Post item)
    {
        if (Posts == null) Posts = new List<Post>();
        if (!Posts.Contains(item)) Posts.Add(item);
    }
}

public class Post
{
    public virtual int Id { get; private set; }
    public virtual string Title { get; set; }
    public virtual string Body { get; set; }
    public virtual Blog Blog { get; private set; }
}

My mappings files look like this:

<hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" default-access="property" auto-import="true" default-cascade="none" default-lazy="true">
  <class xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" name="Model.Blog, TestEntityFramework, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null" table="Blogs">
    <id name="Id" type="System.Int32, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
      <column name="Id" />
      <generator class="identity" />
    </id>
    <property name="Name" type="System.String, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
      <column name="Name" />
    </property>
    <property name="Type" type="System.Int32, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
      <column name="Type" />
    </property>
    <bag lazy="extra" name="Posts">
      <key>
        <column name="Blog_Id" />
      </key>
      <one-to-many class="Model.Post, TestEntityFramework, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null" />
    </bag>
  </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

<hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" default-access="property" auto-import="true" default-cascade="none" default-lazy="true">
  <class xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" name="Model.Post, TestEntityFramework, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null" table="Posts">
    <id name="Id" type="System.Int32, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
      <column name="Id" />
      <generator class="identity" />
    </id>
    <property name="Title" type="System.String, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
      <column name="Title" />
    </property>
    <property name="Body" type="System.String, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">
      <column name="Body" />
    </property>
    <many-to-one class="Model.Blog, TestEntityFramework, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null" name="Blog">
      <column name="Blog_id" />
    </many-to-one>
  </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

My test case looks something like this:

        using (ISession session = Configuration.Current.CreateSession()) // this class returns a custom ISession that represents either EF4 or NHibernate
        {
            blogs = (from b in session.Linq<Blog>()
                         where b.Name.Contains("Test")
                         orderby b.Id
                         select b);

            Console.WriteLine("# of Blogs containing 'Test': {0}", blogs.Count());
            Console.WriteLine("Viewing the first 5 matching Blogs.");

            foreach (Blog b in blogs.Skip(0).Take(5))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Blog #{0} \"{1}\" has {2} Posts.", b.Id, b.Name, b.Posts.Count);
                Console.WriteLine("Viewing first 5 matching Posts.");

                foreach (Post p in b.Posts.Skip(0).Take(5))
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Post #{0} \"{1}\" \"{2}\"", p.Id, p.Title, p.Body);
                }
            }
        }

Using lazy="extra", the call to b.Posts.Count does do a SELECT COUNT(Id)... which is great. However, b.Posts.Skip(0).Take(5) just grabs all Posts for Blog.Id = ?id, and then LINQ on the application side is just taking the first 5 from the resulting collection.

What gives?

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1  
+1 for a good question. I've been wondering about NHibernates lazy loading capabilities for awhile now but haven't had the time to try them out. –  Spencer Ruport Mar 12 '10 at 6:27
1  
maybe the LINQ to NHibernate part regarding collection filters is not implemented –  Jaguar Mar 12 '10 at 8:45
    
Just one caveat for using lazy="extra". We started using this on our application and everything worked fine until we deployed to a Sql Server 2000 machine (still the client's approved software). Because we use a guid as our identity fields, we started getting the exception, 'Cannot perform count on unique identifier' (approx). I looked at the NH source code and found it was the extra lazy load that chooses the first key column and does 'select count(<columName>)', which was our GUID field. –  Rob Kent Jul 22 '11 at 9:17
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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'm pretty sure (reading the comments) that he's talking about the CreateFilter of ISession.

You can do paging like this (from the docs 13.13):

Collections are pageable by using the IQuery interface with a filter:

IQuery q = s.CreateFilter( collection, "" ); // the trivial filter
q.setMaxResults(PageSize); 
q.setFirstResult(PageSize * pageNumber); 
IList page = q.List();

Or (from the docs 17.1.4):

s.CreateFilter( lazyCollection, "").SetFirstResult(0).SetMaxResults(10).List();

That's is not as smooth as using the System.Linq methods. I guess they'll join the syntax some time too.

share|improve this answer
    
that's what i do and it works like advertised –  Jaguar Mar 12 '10 at 8:44
1  
Hmm, yeah. disappointingly unsmooth. But, that'll do. Thanks. –  HackedByChinese Mar 12 '10 at 18:11
    
Hi, Would it be possible to post the original example, with this technique implemented? Thanks. –  UpTheCreek Aug 5 '10 at 5:13
    
+1 for nice work –  David Kemp Aug 27 '10 at 13:20
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