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I have three vectors:

x <- c(1,1,1,1,1, 2,2,2,3,3,  3,3,3,4,4,  5,5,5,5,5 )
y <- c(2,2,1,3,2, 1,4,2,2,NA, 3,3,3,4,NA, 1,4,4,2,NA)
w <- c(1,45,NA,45,NA,45,41,45,96,25,12,NA,7,NA,4,45,12,45,32,56)

How can I find the number of values in W (don`t count NA) for each X and for Y=1? For example, for x=1, number is 0; for x=2 the number is 1; for x=3 the number is 0; for x=4 the number is 0; for x=5 the number is 1

share|improve this question
up vote -3 down vote accepted
df<-data.frame(x,y,w)
nrow(df[which(x==1 & y==1 & !is.na(w)),])

or

df<-data.frame(x,y,w)
aggregate(w ~ x, data=df[which(df$y==1 & !is.na(df$w)),], FUN=length)

The second gives you a table

  x w
1 2 1
2 5 1
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand how this is the accepted answer. It does not do what the OP asked. Either solution. – Simon O'Hanlon Jun 19 '14 at 15:37
    
It does what the OP asked... The first returns the number for a particular x value. The second returns a table. The table does not have x =1,3,4 because those values are 0. – Badoe Jun 19 '14 at 15:39
    
The second formula is better for me. You have two rows in result but how to make NA for other rows? – user3742663 Jun 19 '14 at 15:40
    
No it doesn't. Mine does. Yours does not. I do not see the zero values for x in your second solution and your first is even worse. It just returns 0. The OP specifically asks for the zero results! – Simon O'Hanlon Jun 19 '14 at 15:40
    
@user3742663 Do you really want NA for other rows? Or 0? – Badoe Jun 19 '14 at 15:42
table( !is.na(w) & y==1 , x )
#       x
#        1 2 3 4 5
#  FALSE 5 2 4 1 3
#  TRUE  0 1 0 0 1

Or

table( !is.na(w) & y==1 , x )["TRUE",]
#1 2 3 4 5 
#0 1 0 0 1 

To get this for all y values as well you can still use table(). The following tables the number of all non-NA value for each x and y...

table( x , y , ! is.na(w) )[,,"TRUE"]
#   y
#x   1 2 3 4
#  1 0 2 1 0
#  2 1 1 0 1
#  3 0 1 2 0
#  4 0 0 0 0
#  5 1 1 0 2
share|improve this answer
    
I meant Y==1, not W – user3742663 Jun 19 '14 at 15:22
    
Thanks. But how to solve the same problem not only for y=1 but also for all values from y in descending order (4,3,2,1)? So the output should contain 20 rows including NAs. – user3742663 Jun 20 '14 at 4:06
    
@user3742663 that's a bit of a different question, but see the edit! – Simon O'Hanlon Jun 20 '14 at 7:08

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