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This should work similar to memoize, but very differently. While memoize should be used with pure functions, it is often useful to speed up IO related functions.

The function/macro I'm looking for should behave like higher order function. The function it produces should:

  • when called for 1st time, it should call the original function, passing arguments to it
  • remember: arguments, return value
  • when called 2nd time
    • with the same arguments: it should return memoized return value
    • with different arguments: forget last arguments and return value, call the original function, remember current arguments and return value
  • when called nth time, always compare the arguments to the last call, and behave like described above.
share|improve this question
    
This is exactly like memoize except it only remembers one argument->value pair. – Chuck Jun 19 '14 at 15:35
up vote 7 down vote accepted

It would be easy enough to modify the source of memoize to do this.

(defn memo-one [f]
  (let [mem (atom {})]
    (fn [& args]
      (if-let [e (find @mem args)]
        (val e)
        (let [ret (apply f args)]
          (reset! mem {args ret})
          ret)))))

(defn foo [x] (println "called foo") x)
(def memo-foo (memo-one foo))

However, there is already a flexible memoization library available that can do this.

(require '[clojure.core.memoize :as memo])

(defn foo [x] (println "called foo") x)
(def memo-foo (memo/lru foo :lru/threshold 1))

(memo-foo 1)
; called foo
; 1
(memo-foo 1)
; 1
(memo-foo 2)
; called foo
; 2  
(memo-foo 1)
; called foo
; 1
share|improve this answer
    
nice, in particular that you avoid swapping in the case where the value is already held – noisesmith Jun 19 '14 at 17:30
    
I realized I needed something completely different (custom caching strategy), but basically I ended up using this before the realization. Bonus question: fast, memory efficient way to compare typed arrays :) (yup, those are my arguments, and I reuse them for performance). – skrat Jun 20 '14 at 9:59
    
@skrat I suggest asking your bonus question as a new question with details about how you are using the arrays. If you are reusing identical arrays, then the answer is straightforward. – A. Webb Jun 20 '14 at 17:25

Here is a version using clojure.core only. I borrowed the foo function from A. Webb's example for demonstration.

(defn memoize-1
  [f]
  (let [previous (atom nil)]
    (fn [& args]
      (second
       (swap! previous
              (fn [[prev-args prev-val :as prev]]
                (if (and prev (= prev-args args))
                  prev
                  [args (apply f args)])))))))


user> (defn foo [x] (println "called foo") x)
#'user/foo
user> (def memo-foo (memoize-1 foo))
#'user/memo-foo
user> (memo-foo 1)
called foo
1
user> (memo-foo 1)
1
user> (memo-foo 2)
called foo
2
user> (memo-foo 1)
called foo
1
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