Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently, I've written a repository in which entities are being stored. That entity is an object and is inheriting from the base class "Entity".

public class Entity
{
    #region Constructors

    public Entity() : this(DateTime.Now, DateTime.Now) { }

    public Entity(DateTime creationDate, DateTime updateDate)
    {
        DateCreated = creationDate;
        DateUpdated = updateDate;
    }

    #endregion

    #region Properties

    [Key]
    [Required]
    [Column(Order= 0)]
    public int Id { get; private set; }

    [Required]
    [Column(Order = 998)]
    public DateTime DateCreated { get; private set; }

    [Required]
    [Column(Order = 999)]
    public DateTime DateUpdated { get; internal set; }

    #endregion
}

Now I want to unit test (not integration test) the repository holding an object that implements an Entity.

I've created a fake repository that uses a HashSet to store objects in memory. Now, the problem is that, when I add entities to my repository, all the Id values are assigned '0' which is normal.

On Entity Framework, they are assigned a unique int value (starting from 0), which is also normal due to the data annotations.

Now I would like to know how I can mimic the same behaviour for the Data Annotations when running unit tests, because right now, I can have multiple records in my repository which the same 'Key' value, which should off course not be possible under any circumstances.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're already using constructor chaining to pass in default DateTime values for creationDate and updateDate -- why not add one more?

public class Entity
{
    #region Constructors

    public Entity() : this(DateTime.Now, DateTime.Now, default(int)) { }

    public Entity(DateTime creationDate, DateTime updateDate, int id)
    {
        DateCreated = creationDate;
        DateUpdated = updateDate;
        Id = id
    }

    #endregion

    #region Properties

    [Key]
    [Required]
    [Column(Order= 0)]
    public int Id { get; private set; }

    [Required]
    [Column(Order = 998)]
    public DateTime DateCreated { get; private set; }

    [Required]
    [Column(Order = 999)]
    public DateTime DateUpdated { get; internal set; }

    #endregion
}

Then you can generate a unique ID for each entity as necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
I've thought about that to be honest. But I just wanted to check if there were other ways to test it. Maybe those attributes have some hidden magic power in them... –  Complexity Jun 19 at 18:32
    
That's one of the reasons I don't like EF, TBQH. It encourages you to dirty your beautiful, pristine POCOs with a bunch of EF attributes. –  Daniel Mann Jun 19 at 18:34
    
Hehe. But thanks for your answer. I will accept it. –  Complexity Jun 19 at 18:34
1  
@DanielMann One does not have to since there is the fluent api: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj591617.aspx –  paulroho Jun 19 at 20:53

Sounds like you are trying to test the wrong thing. What exactly are you trying to accomplish? KeyAttribute is an implementation detail of your storage layer, and you don't want to test that -- it's the vendor's job to ensure it works.

A fake repository is a means of testing something else that depends on the repository interface in isolation. Thus, what you probably should be doing is creating a test case wherein your repository is set up to throw an exception appropriate for a duplicate key scenario, then verifying that your system under test does the right thing when it encounters that exception.

However, you may wish to ensure that all your entities have KeyAttribute on their Id property. You can do that as a single unit test that enumerates your entity types and uses reflection to verify the existence of the attribute.

share|improve this answer
    
My repository holds a collection of objects and has a method GetById which I would like to test. Therfore all entities should have different id's. –  Complexity Jun 19 at 18:39
    
Help me understand: under which circumstances does it make sense for you to be testing an implementation of a method of a fake class? –  Rytmis Jun 19 at 18:41
    
There you have a point. But I'd like to achieve almost 100% code coverage so therefore it's needed to test. It might not be needed but I like those numbers. And I might have a class that takes an implementation of a repository. So to unit test it I need to pass an implementation of it which is a fake. Makes that more sense? –  Complexity Jun 19 at 18:46
2  
Code coverage is a meaningless metric. It doesn't prove anything about the quality of your code or the number of bugs present. It's more important to test the right things. –  Daniel Mann Jun 19 at 18:48
    
I know, but I think I'm just fanisacted by those numbers. –  Complexity Jun 19 at 19:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.