Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How can I get the scripts of Stored procedures, Views, Functions, Triggers in toad for oracle?

share|improve this question

In general, you should use dbms_metadata to retrieve DDL statements. eg.

select dbms_metadata.get_ddl('VIEW', 'V_MYVIEW') from dual;

This can of course be wrapped in a query over the data dictionary, eg.

select dbms_metadata.get_ddl(object_type, object_name) 
from user_objects
where object_type in ('VIEW', 'PROCEDURE', 'FUNCTION', 'TRIGGER');
share|improve this answer
    
This is not working for me. I am having a database and I want the scripts written for store procedures , views , triggers for backup process. is there anything in toad or any qurey that will give me these scripts – WENzER Mar 12 '10 at 10:09
    
+1 ... I have seen (in the past, don't know about the current version of Toad) problems with 3rd-party tools providing an incomplete or incorrect reverse-engineered definition of Oracle objects. @WENzER - what specific problems did you encounter with dbms_metadata? – dpbradley Mar 12 '10 at 13:15
1  
You should be using RMAN for backups, rather than trying to dump out the scripts and re-run them. This will be a lot easier in the long run as there are lots of potential pitfalls that will make this approach difficult. – a'r Mar 12 '10 at 13:22
    
+1 This worked great for me with the correct privileges. – AieshaDot Aug 9 '10 at 22:21

Toad has several ways to do this. You can just double-click any code object in the Schema browser and an editor will open, showing you the creation DDL for that object. Or just select the object in the left hand side of the Schema Browser, and select the Script tab on the right hand side (if you don't see the Script tab, check your options).

But if you want to see DDL for a lot of objects, select all the object in the Schema Browser, or search for them in the Object Search window. Then right-click and select Save as Script. Also I think there is an Extract DDL tool which does basically the same thing, but I might be thinking of SQL Navigator. There is also a way to export and entire schema as a creation script. However some of these functions may depend on your license level.

BTW, this isn't a programming question.

share|improve this answer

In Toad menu, select Database -> Schema Browser. Use the tabs appeared to navigate between views, procedures, tables, trigger, functions...

share|improve this answer

Actually, if you go into the schema browser, you can right-click on any object (or multiple objects) and save it as a script.

share|improve this answer

If we use dba_source table it will give scripts the of Procedures functions and triggers we have to use SELECT TEXT FROM dba_source WHERE TYPE = 'Procedure';

share|improve this answer

Sorry guys, I came across this thread trying to solve the problem in PL/SQL. The information here actually helped me, Im of the mind it might help someone else.

In PL SQL developer, right click on a view, towards the bottom there is an option DBMS_METADATA. That has a flyout where you can choose DDL.

At my current client , I get an ORA-31603. Object 'objname' of type 'VIEW' not found in schema 'schemaName'

This is a permissions issue, which can technically be solved. Whether or not your organization wants to allow you to do your job is a matter you will have to take up w/ them.

http://www.tek-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=1666882#

share|improve this answer

Try Ctrl+ LeftMouseClick on object name (function table view ,...) in your query

share|improve this answer

In toad, try Ctrl+left mouse click on object name (function table view...) in your query.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.