Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am attempting to bind c# generics to a class and an interface like this:

public class WizardPage<T> where T : UserControl, IWizardControl 
{
    private T page;

    public WizardPage( T page ) {
        this.page = page;
    }
}

And use it with this:

public class MyControl : UserControl, IWizardControl {
   //...
}

Somehow C# doesn't seem to be able to decide that MyControl is a proper instance of T as

public class Wizard<T> where T : UserControl, IWizardControl {

    private WizardPage<T> Page1;

    public Wizard( MyControl control ) {
        this.Page1 = new WizardPage(control);
    }
}

fails with error

The best overloaded method match for 'Controls.WizardPage<T>.WizardPage(T)' has some invalid arguments

Am I doing something wrong or is this just not going to work?

share|improve this question
1  
This looks a lot like my forehead-slapping moment from a while back: stackoverflow.com/questions/418764/… –  Matt Hamilton Mar 12 '10 at 9:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your Wizard class should probably look something like this:

public class Wizard<T> where T : UserControl, IWizardControl
{
    private WizardPage<T> Page1;

    public Wizard(T control)
    {
        this.Page1 = new WizardPage<T>(control);
    }
}

Or, if you don't need the class itself to be generic you could do something like this instead:

public class Wizard
{
    private WizardPage<MyControl> Page1;

    public Wizard(MyControl control)
    {
        this.Page1 = new WizardPage<MyControl>(control);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This far I got that I had it working in the latter form. Unfortunately I cannot then have a private WizardPage<T> ActivePage; member variable as it needs to be generic. The first syntax just didn't work, It only created the same errors as before. Maybe I just store the IWizardControl reference as the UserControl stuff I don't need afterwards. –  plouh Mar 12 '10 at 10:20

you have to declare the type used :

this.Page1 = new WizardPage<MyControl>(control);
share|improve this answer
    
This I tried already, but it says "cannot implicitly convert to type". –  plouh Mar 12 '10 at 9:49

I don't get the Wizard class. Shouldn't it rather be something like this:

public class MyWizard : WizardPage<MyControl>{ 
    public MyWizard( MyControl control ) : base(control) { } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
No. Wizard manages pages and transitions between them while WizardPages themselves are merely listening to the relevant UserControl and attach to certain events via IWizardControl interface. Simple solution would just be to create abstract WizardControl class to derive from that would extend UserControl and implement IWizardControl, but I wanted to try if there were more elegant solution available. –  plouh Mar 12 '10 at 10:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.