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How to check if a certain bit in a byte is set?

bool IsBitSet(Byte b,byte nPos)
{
   return .....;
}
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3  
Smells like a homework problem. –  Skizz Mar 12 '10 at 9:47
    
Your last bit of text does not any sense. –  leppie Mar 12 '10 at 9:48
6  
It sounds like a homework problem but think how much people get benifit from this code snipset.. –  Manjoor Mar 12 '10 at 10:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 52 down vote accepted

sounds a bit like homework, but:

bool IsBitSet(byte b, int pos)
{
   return (b & (1 << pos)) != 0;
}

pos 0 is least significant bit, pos 7 is most.

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12  
yet another one-liner I always google for instead of just learn it :) –  grapkulec Oct 14 '10 at 9:04

Right shift your input n bits down and mask with 1, then test whether you have 0 or 1.

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I prefer this way around too, left shifting just seems so unnatural :) –  leppie Mar 12 '10 at 9:52

This also works (tested in .NET 4):

void Main()
{
    //0x05 = 101b
    Console.WriteLine(IsBitSet(0x05, 0)); //True
    Console.WriteLine(IsBitSet(0x05, 1)); //False
    Console.WriteLine(IsBitSet(0x05, 2)); //True
}

bool IsBitSet(byte b, byte nPos){
    return new BitArray(new[]{b})[nPos];
}
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1  
If you're bit fiddling, you're probably after performance. Doing it this way may feel more OO, but it's going to kill perf. –  Drew Noakes Oct 31 '12 at 0:29

Based on Mario Fernandez's answer, I thought why not have it in my toolbox as a handy extension method not limited to datatype, so I hope it's OK to share it here:

/// <summary>
/// Returns whether the bit at the specified position is set.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Any integer type.</typeparam>
/// <param name="t">The value to check.</param>
/// <param name="pos">
/// The position of the bit to check, 0 refers to the least significant bit.
/// </param>
/// <returns>true if the specified bit is on, otherwise false.</returns>
public static bool IsBitSet<T>(this T t, int pos) where T : struct, IConvertible
{
 var value = t.ToInt64(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
 return (value & (1 << pos)) != 0;
}
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Here is the solution in words.

Left shift an integer with initial value 1 n times and then do an AND with the original byte. If the result is non-zero, bit is Set otherwise not. :)

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Ok. Byte of 3, test if bit 1 is set. So 1<<1 is 2. 2&3 isn't true. Fail. –  spender Mar 12 '10 at 9:51
    
@spender: err, surely 2 and 3 is 2 (in binary 10 and 11 = 10) which is non-zero and therefore a true result. OK, C# doesn't let you do that like C/C++ does so you'd need a != 0 test. –  Skizz Mar 12 '10 at 9:55
    
Perhaps the check should be for non-zero? afaik, non-zero ain't true. –  spender Mar 12 '10 at 9:55
    
Yes the check should be for non-zero instead of true. My C++ background :) –  Aamir Mar 12 '10 at 9:59
    
+1 I've always just googled this and ignored the solution. Reading your solution made me understand it (along with a pencil, some zeros, and some ones). Thanks. –  Stephano Oct 14 '11 at 6:59

something like

return ((0x1 << nPos) & b) != 0
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To check the bits in a 16-bit word:

  Int16 WordVal = 16;
  for (int i = 0; i < 15; i++)
  {
     bitVal = (short) ((WordVal >> i) & 0x1);
     sL = String.Format("Bit #{0:d} = {1:d}", i, bitVal);
     Console.WriteLine(sL);
  }
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x == (x | Math.Pow(2, y));

int x = 5;

x == (x | Math.Pow(2, 0) //Bit 0 is ON;
x == (x | Math.Pow(2, 1) //Bit 1 is OFF;
x == (x | Math.Pow(2, 2) //Bit 2 is ON;
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It is usually a good practice on SO to explain your solution, more the why than the how. –  ForceMagic Oct 11 '12 at 3:41

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